Double Sided DVD R discs?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DeathStar1, Aug 21, 2002.

  1. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    I just received my DVD Writer, as mentioned in another topic, and I am begining to capture material for my first test disc. Heh, I should also save up for a new hard drive, because ten gigabytes won't cut it [​IMG].
    But, a question. I've been reading my instruction booklet and I'll be able to fit 3 hours of stuff on one disc. But, if they made double sided, I'd naturally be able to fit 6 hours instead....
    Anyone know if these exist?
     
  2. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Verbatim makes double-sided DVD-R and DVD-RAM, although the DVD-R only comes in a 50-pack(!). DV Direct is one place that sells them.
    How much you can fit on one side depends on the bitrate. 3 hours is pretty low quality.
    //Ken
     
  3. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    {COUGH!!!} {GAG!!!} {SPLUTTER!!!!}
    Are they out of their @&*@#$*%@ minds?!!!! [​IMG]
    $1,100 for 50 double-sided DVD-Rs?! Holy Mother of God! That's over $20 a piece! Considering that regular DVD-Rs can be found for less than $2 each, what the hell are they thinking?! (Yes, yes, I know. New technology, very rare at this point, blah, blah.)
    [​IMG]
    Screw that! I'd rather pay $5 for two DVD-Rs and put them in a dual-DVD case that costs about $2.50!!
    Damn! I have to get myself cleaned up now.
     
  4. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    John I understand where you are coming from but it was less then 6 months ago when DVD-R discs were that price or more. It just takes a little bit for mass production to start and the price will come down. Same with the DVD burners they started well over 1K and now they are under $300 (for your computer).

    KyleS
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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  6. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  7. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    Personally, I would buy yourself an 80GB HD, that will be enough to comfortably do DVDs. 100min is the most I'd do on a single layer >>

    Yep, 7200 RPM Maxtor 80 GB Hard Drive is the final thing on the list. First to be replaced this year was motherboard(due to old one dying), TV Tuner was next, now the CD Writer was upgraded to the DVD Writer just the other day. HD is next on the list.

    I'm STILL trying to figure out how I can backup all of my files on the DVD RW disc they sent me properly. Easy enough to do on a CDR, apparently on a DVD R is a bit more complicated...
     
  8. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  9. Brian-W

    Brian-W Screenwriter

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  10. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    That's still a chunk of change to throw out at once, but it's certainly more reasonable. It still begs the question of which is better at this point since two DVD-Rs are still cheaper than one DS DVD-R.
    Do they also supply inner ring labels to identify which side is A and which side is B? [​IMG]
     
  11. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    Well, I finally figured out how to properly backup files on a DVD. Although, I mucked up on the DVD R they gave me, so I can't try and create my first DVD Video yet. I was using the wrong #$@# program for the Data backup...
     
  12. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I cannot recommend strongly enough that you use DVD-RW for testing! I have not had a DVD player fail with a DVD-RW that didn't fail with a DVD-R! I can honestly say that I have NEVER made a coaster by testing on DVD-RW first, and compared to CD-Rs, DVD-Rs are expensive coasters.
     
  13. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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  14. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  15. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    DV is 25 megabits and it's more or less the same as MPEG with all I-frames, except for the 4:1:1 subsampling. But not all DV encoders have the same quality. Were you using something with a DV encoder chip or was it depending on a software codec (typically Microsoft's)? A hardware encoder is almost always better than software, one exception is Canopus which has an excellent software DV codec.
     
  16. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Microsoft's DV codec is horrific

    Canopus has a superb one, as does Pinnacle. Don't forget, you're more paying for that codec than the hardware
     
  17. Andy Olivera

    Andy Olivera Screenwriter

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  18. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Like I said, it's what I have at my disposal. I could bring a little Mini-DV deck to my HT, or I could bring my huge laserdisc player to the DV editing station and capture straight to the hard disk. Either way, it had to go to DV because I don't have anything that can capture MPEG-2. And if I did, there's no chance that it could capture in realtime at the target bit rate to fit a two hour movie on a single layer DVD (~4500 Kbps) with the same quality as what TMPGEnc can do with variable bit rate, making two passes, removing 3:2 pulldown, and being allowed to take its sweet time to do the job. There's a definite trade-off between quality and speed.

    And I didn't see any obvious digital artifacts despite going through two codecs. The unavoidable single generation of analog video and the general shortcomings of the laserdisc format such as the poor chroma bandwidth are more obvious. I could be wrong but I think the 4:1:1 chroma subsampling of DV is still good enough to capture all of the laserdisc chroma.
     
  19. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    You wouldn't have to capture in real-time into MPEG-2. You could capture into AVI with a good analog capture card and a lossless codec, then take your time to encode that to MPEG. To do it in one pass, you'd only need a hundred gig or so [​IMG]
    //Ken
     
  20. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    The editing system that's available to me does only DV. Believe me, I didn't overlook any opportunities to gain more quality.
     

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