Dolby Surround sound (5.1) from a VCR???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Marc_M, Jan 29, 2002.

  1. Marc_M

    Marc_M Auditioning

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    If one records a movie on a VHS VCR OR SVHS VCR from a digital cable source that is being broadcast in say dolby digital, will the subsequent VCR audio playback capture the 5.1 sound effect?

    Marc
     
  2. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Cinematographer

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    No. If it's a Hi-Fi VCR you will get stereo, but that's it.

    Adam
     
  3. Marc_M

    Marc_M Auditioning

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    Sorry for the incomplete question!! The essence of the original question was whether one would get channel separation from a VCR if it is being processed through a receiver with Dolby Prologic II and or DTS Neo. Secondly if that is the case, would the quality of the audio be any better using a SVHS VCR??

    Marc
     
  4. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Cinematographer

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    If you record a cable broadcast with a 5.1-channel soundtrack using a Hi-Fi video connected to the digital cable box's stereo outputs, you will be recording a downmixed two-channel Dolby Surround soundtrack. This downmix will contain left, right, centre and surround information, but no LFE channel information (enhanced bass) and no discrete surround information.

    Played back via a Pro Logic decoder these channels will be recreated from the recorded stereo soundtrack, giving you four channel surround sound, but will sound no better than any conventional Dolby Surround soundtrack.

    Via a Pro Logic 2 or Neo:6 decoder the result will be closer to the original 5.1-channel source, but won't fully recreate the original soundtrack (no LFE, no intended stereo surround effects, reduced channel separation and dynamic range).

    Both VHS and S-VHS use the same audio recording system, so an S-VHS version won't offer any sonic advantages over ordinary Hi-Fi VHS. Both VHS and S-VHS Hi-Fi audio are capable of a reproducing frequencies from 20Hz-20kHz with a dynamic range of about 90dB (which is near CD quality).

    Adam
     
  5. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    Depending on your brand of receiver, if you attempt to record audio from a digitally-connected component to an analog-connected component, you will get no audio whatsoever. This is the case with my Sony DA50ES. If I attempt to record a DVD to SVHS tape via the DVD player's digital output, or record a CD to analog cassette via the CD player's digital output, I get no audio recording at all. I must use the analog outputs on the DVD player or CD player, which provides downmixed two-channel audio (as Adam mentioned).

    Some other brands of receivers will allow you to convert digital to analog audio within the receiver. Check the specifications for your receiver.
     

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