Does anyone use a Denon AVR1801 as a pre/pro?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Steve T, Jul 23, 2001.

  1. Steve T

    Steve T Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a few questions about using the Denon AVR1801 as a pre/pro (or any receiver with preamp outputs for that matter). I added an external amp to the receiver this weekend and just wondered how things work in this configuration (the 1801 has only preamp outputs for front L/R and center channels, and I am using only the L/R at this time).
    Since the 1801's main A/B speaker outputs are no longer being used, do I keep their output on? It seems that if I don't leave either the A or B speaker outputs on, none of the other channels work (center and L/R surrounds). I have not listened to any 5.1 sources yet, only stereo so I have not confirmed this. With both the A/B speaker outputs off, I now hear a much better quality sound for CD and DVD in stereo. It's almost as if turning the A/B speaker outputs off is giving an analog direct type of sound from analog sources. Digital sources sound great as well. There is also no subwoofer output with the A/B speaker outputs off, so is there no DSP processing going on? I realize the external amp is adding much of the improvement that I hear.
    Any information you guys have would be appreciated.
    [Edited last by Steve T on July 23, 2001 at 01:39 PM]
     
  2. Mickey Brown

    Mickey Brown Stunt Coordinator

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    I bought an 1801 when I first started out 6 months ago. Since then I bought a five channel Carver amp. I also bought an Audio Control Rialto home theater equalizer to try to tame the peaks of my room. I turn off the sub in the setup of my 1801, and direct all the bass to the mains. My mains and center plug into the Rialto which has a high quality xover at 70hz.
    I have been quite pleased with the sound, but I would eventually like to get a dedicated pre/pro sometime down the road with all the outs/preouts etc..
     
  3. MatthewJ S

    MatthewJ S Supporting Actor

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    the two most common things that people often do wrong (imo) in their home theater set-ups , are to use non-voice matched speakers, and to use receivers as pre/pro's. This is not to say that we all don't do some weird things as a temporary solution, but the key word is temporary...the build quality on the audio output stage (low level) of most receivers is nothing close to that of even low-end pre-pros so while we may gain in the amp side, we loose on the pre-outs...but moving to separates is expensive and this is one way of spreading out the beatings we'll get from our s.o.'s
    ,Ha-Ha
     
  4. Steve T

    Steve T Stunt Coordinator

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    Using a receiver as a pre/pro may not be as good as using separates, but it is a step in the right direction.
     
  5. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    I have been using a Denon 3300 as a pre-amp for almost 3 years. I have been very pleased with the results and plan to upgrade to a 3802 (also as a pre-amp) soon. Would a separate pre-amp "sound" better? In theory yes but no guarantees. At the time I bought my 3300, there was nothing on the market that offered it's features and processing horsepower within $500 of the list price. The new Outlaw pre-amp coming will apparently be a very good value, but it won't have Denon's Mono Movie mode or 5 Channel Stereo that I make use of from time to time.
    I run a 5 channel Carver amp that is THX rated down to 3.2 ohms. This amp runs fairly cool, even when on for hours and hours. My main reason for using the amp is for it's ability to drive lower speaker impedences and keep it's cool.
    Bottom line, based on my experience, I'd recommend trying a receiver as a pre-amp to anyone.
    (I can't help you with the A/B speaker question. My 3300 doesn't offer it.)
    ------------------
    [Edited last by Chuck Kent on July 25, 2001 at 05:38 AM]
     
  6. Burke Strickland

    Burke Strickland Second Unit

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    Although I now have an actual pre/pro "separate" to feed my power amps, I used a Yamaha DSP-A3090 integrated amp as a pre-pro for several years. I found it to be quite satisfactory, until my cumulative upgrades of other portions of the system (incuding a state-of-the art power amp, significantly higher-end speakers and better quality playback units) finally cried out for the last step-up in resolution, air and space around instruments, etcetera, that an SGHT "AAA" rated pre/pro or a high end two channel preamp can deliver. (in effect, my new unit is both.)
    Actually, the Yammie was "AAA" in its SGHT category in its day, so it was no slouch. But it was getting long in the tooth... :>) lacking a number of up-to-date features I gained by stepping up, in addition to the enhanced musical qualities I now enjoy. However, by using it as a pre/pro until I had the other upgrades in place helped my budget considerably, in effect, allowing the other upgrades to be achieved more rapidly. And I do not regret waiting at all, since I had time to do extensive comparison shopping without being in any kind of rush, and lucked into an incredible deal on my new pre/pro at just the right time... (i.e., when I was "ready" to buy it.) :>)
    Nope, I don't see anything "wrong" at all with using an existing in-system HT receiver/integrated amp as a stepping stone to full separates. And with certain levels of associated equipment, (one might convincingly argue MOST levels) :>) they still make perfect sense as an original purchase.
    Burke
     

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