Does a DVD player benifit from a seperate DAC and/or Anti-Jitter unit?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Michael Ipp, Dec 10, 2001.

  1. Michael Ipp

    Michael Ipp Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,

    Sorry if this question is a bit novice but I am totaly confused. I currently have a setup in my bedroom that I am taking down and was wondering if I could incorporate it into my HT.

    I have CAL Sigma II Tube DAC and a Monarcy Audio DIP (Anti-jitter). Will I benifit if I use them with my dvd player to watch movies? Or only if I listen to music through the dvd player?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I may be wrong, but I believe that jitter is only a problem with PCM signals, since they use an analog clock. DD and DTS are not subject to jitter.
     
  3. Kirk Sims

    Kirk Sims Auditioning

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    Michael,

    I am currently using a DIP Superdrive in my HT rig. It really doesn't make a difference with my RP91, but does improve the Satellite receiver's sound quality.

    I have a MSB Link Dac plugged into a second system with a old Lexicon processor without internal DAC's. That also was an improvement. But if you have a late model receiver/processor with internal DAC's, using the CAL won't help much. You would then being running your signal through an unnecessary, additional A/D conversion step.

    Definitely try the DIP and see if you like it in your rig. Also check to make sure it can pass DD and DTS, not sure if the Original DIP can or not.

    Kirk
     
  4. Max Knight

    Max Knight Supporting Actor

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    If I understand it correctly, DD and DTS are a packet style information transfer, and thus are not susceptible to jitter like PCM data is. So using an outboard DAC/jitter correction may improve your DVD player's sound when you play CDs on it, but only when you play CDs on it.

    -Max
     
  5. michael_I

    michael_I Auditioning

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    I am using theb Marantz SR8000. I'm not quite sure if I am clear on the DAC. How would it be an additinal D to A step?

    If I use the Digital out on the DVD player, to my DAC, which converts it Analog, then from my DAC to my reciver's analog input, it is only being converted once.

    The point is made that DTS and DD are PCM. But doesnt the digital data have to be converetd to analog at some point to play through the speakers? I undertstand not needing a anti-jitter, but what if the outboard DAC is better then the onboard DAC?
     
  6. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Check out www.jitter.de . They are selling a product, but until you get to that point, a really good explanation of jitter. It's in there, but they also point out that *most* de-jitterers simply pass DD/DTS signals unaltered. Only affects PCM (CD) signals.
    And as far as a de-jitterer improving a satellite transmission, that's not likely either, right? Satellite is MPEG2 which is also a packeted data stream?
     
  7. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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  8. Max Knight

    Max Knight Supporting Actor

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    Michael,

    To answer your question, an outboard DAC could be better for music. It would not be an extra D/A conversion, but it would be an extra link in your equipment chain. The more digital steps in your equipment chain, the more jitter can take its toll on your sound quality. Some really nice DACs like the DAC-1 (I think blue circle makes it) incorporate an anti-jitter device to combat this. The issue is that the different digital devices (the source component, then the dac) have different clocks. If these clocks are out of step with each other jitter can happen. Jitter is reduced on "one box" solutions because the source section and the DA section share the same clock. But of course, a higher quality outboard DAC could provide sonic benefit even if there was a higher level of jitter.

    So, to answer the first question of the thread:

    A higher quality outboard DAC and/or anti-jitter device can help a DVD player sound better, but only when it is playing CDs.

    -Max
     
  9. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Ooo- You have to be careful.

    For example, my pre/pro converts *everything* to digital, processes it (crossover, speaker distances/delays), then back to analog. So for me, an external DAC (for linear PCM signals) would only add more jitter:

    CD (digital output)

    to pre/pro (maintains digital, processes it, then to analog to amps then speakers)

    CD (digital output)

    to external DAC (converts digital to analog)

    to pre/pro (analog input, which simply converts it back to digital, processes it, then back to analog to amps then speakers)

    Some receivers/pre pros now have option to keep in analog domain within, but typically you lose bass management then.
     

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