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Do You Attend Revival Shows/Theaters?

Discussion in 'Movies' started by EricSchulz, Apr 1, 2019.

  1. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    Being a kid of the 60's I grew up watching the classics on TV. With the advent of home theater the experience was great but there's something about seeing a movie on the big screen with an audience. Now, more than ever, there are opportunities to see them in theaters again, often restored.

    The first one I remember seeing was the restored version of Rear Window back in the 80's. Living in Chicago I have SO MANY options! There's a silent film appreciation group that shows films (some for free!) with live organ accompaniment. Every October the Music Box Theater shows classic horror movies from the 20's, 30's and 40's. A FANTASTIC run!

    So, what are the classic films you've seen on the big screen that you really enjoyed or what films are you hoping to someday see in a theater like they were meant to be?
     
  2. Jeff Adkins

    Jeff Adkins Cinematographer

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    I tend to only see the big epic films when they come back around theatrically. I saw 2001: a space odyssey and The Dark Knight (70mm) this past year. I have a hard enough time keeping up with new movies at the theater as it is. I usually already own Blu-Rays of most of the things being brought back to theaters, so unless it's something large format, I normally don't go.

    I went to see The Breakfast Club about two years ago and it turned out to be a huge mistake. Most of the people in the audience were talking throughout the whole movie. Most people have seen that movie umpteen times that I guess they felt they didn't need to pay attention.
     
  3. cinemiracle

    cinemiracle Screenwriter

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    I haven't been to the cinema in a year as I hate digital projection on cinema screens and even more so the brain-dead morons who use mobiles and talk during films. Besides who wants to suffer more than 15 minutes of commercials before a film starts? Not me. Unfortunately rare 70mm screenings are mostly shown on small cinemascope sized screens in multiplexes and without any curtains. Neither are the screens curved as TODD-AO screens should be. Where I worked we had a 60 ft wide and curved TODD-AO screen.Sadly even even two recent films projected in 70mm were digital and transferred to 70mm film. I am referring to ROMA and MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS. For MOTOE the 70mm footage shot was then transferred to digital before being put back onto 70mm film for cinema release. That is not a true 70mm film. I did see HATEFUL 8 in 70mm and was shocked that it was projected onto a cinemascope size screen without any curtains and the screen was flat and in a multiplex of 15 plus screens.Never again! The only true screen for seeing 70mm on a 62 ft wide screen is a 12 hour train journey from where I live.
     
  4. KPmusmag

    KPmusmag Screenwriter
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    I have attended some screenings at the Seattle Cinerama 70mm Festival, which they typically do in September. I love seeing real celluloid on that huge screen, but it is a plane ride so it depends on schedule and finances.

    The only thing locally is the Fathom screenings, but the theaters here tend to play them in the smallest auditorium, which is hardly larger than my projector room at home.

    Back in the 1970s - 80s I lived in the L.A. area and I loved the revival houses. Although some of the prints were faded or damaged, it was still wonderful to see the widescreen films, especially, as those were still the days of pan and scan on TV.
     
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  5. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    I saw Psycho about six or seven years ago. The crowd (as I find it to be for most of these) ranged from 20's to 70's. MOST of the people in the audience had probably seen it before or at least knew the basic storyline but...you could hear a pin drop in the theater! Everyone was so focused on the movie it was fantastic!
     
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  6. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    I do, but it's increasingly rare. I definitely was more likely to go to revival screenings before I had a projector at home, and when it was still possible to see actual 35mm prints of films in theaters.

    I'm really glad that digital makes it easy to show classic movies in theaters for people to see. But theater prices where i live, in NYC, are extraordinarily expensive, and it's hard for me to justify spending $15-20 to watch a DCP made from the same master as the Blu-ray I have at home. This is especially true for most revivals at conventional theaters, which are often shown on the smallest screen in the complex. I've also been really bothered by audience behavior at just about every single movie screening I've gone to this year and last year. People just won't stop talking and/or playing with their phones during a movie. It seems like it can be even worse for a revival when they already know the movie, as if that somehow makes it okay to not pay attention and to disrupt everyone else.

    But I'm still game for any chance to see a film in something that approximates its original presentation. I was majorly thrilled to see "2001: A Space Odyssey" in a variety of formats last summer. That was the rare re-release worth supporting, because it was actually being put into theaters as if it was a brand new, first run film. So to see that on giant IMAX screens was a real treat, and something I'd gladly do again.

    And I was just able to snag a single seat to a special screening of Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy at New York's Lincoln Square IMAX. They will be showing all three films in a row, all from 15/70 prints. It was very expensive - $80 - and I still may change my mind and return the ticket, but I will probably end up going. I love those movies, and even though it's costing way more than it would cost to buy on a physical media format, the chance to see them in their original IMAX presentations is something I most likely won't be able to turn down.

    So that's basically my answer - I'm in for any revival where the film being shown has a chance to be presented in a magnificent fashion, but less interested in paying for poorer quality presentations of things I already have at home.
     
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  7. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    Great show at a theatre in St. Charles (west Chicago burbs). A Laurel and Hardy festival presented by the Bacon Grabbers, a part of the Sons of the Desert appreciation group! It showed Bacon Grabbers (1929, silent), Big Business (same) and SotD. Great crowd, live organ accompaniment and lots of laughs!
     

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  8. Message #8 of 9 Dec 14, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2019
    RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

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    Been to the Samuel L. Goldwyn Theater several times (run by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences). Seen a number of classic films there with people involved with their making in attendance.
     
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  9. Reggie W

    Reggie W Producer

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    Yes, if I end up near one I like and something is playing I want to see. When I am in Manhattan over on the Lower East Side I always check what is playing at the Metrograph. They seem to always be showing something I want to see.

    http://metrograph.com/

    Right now they are showing 4 Malick films on 35mm and Bunny Lake is Missing. Plus I tend to end up in some interesting chats at the bar. It's a cool place.
     

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