Do they make this? Is this possible? (Dual-Head Monitor related)

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Michael D. Bunting, Apr 6, 2004.

  1. Michael D. Bunting

    Michael D. Bunting Screenwriter

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    At work, my main work station features a dual-headed display setup.

    I would like to add a "splitter" of some sort to the current setup - so that I can route what is shown on the dual heads to a plasma screen that we have on our wall.

    Is this possible? Do they make some sort of a splitter I can order or pick up somewhere?

    Thanks
     
  2. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Hmm triple head (primary, extension, and a clone). Sounds like something Matrox would do. Not sure of any splitter.
     
  3. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    You want both monitors to go to the plasma, or just one?
     
  4. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    What I read is that he has two monitors and wants to display the combined screens on a single widescreen plasma.

    If I'm not off in left field then yes it should be doable. Though I imagine a touch pricier than first thoughts. Since monitors communicate back to the computer I don't think a simple splitter would function well. . . Which means that an interface box would be the likely solution. I can't say for sure though since I've never tried this. Then in theory two of those combined with a plasma that can do side-by-side display and has two RGB inputs and your in business.

    Though if you were skilled I suppose you could make a simple splitter and only allow one of the two outputs to communicate back. . . but then we run into issues of how a monitor would react to having it's input signal power cut in half.

    Hrm. . . I suppose a simple scan-converter and two normal inputs into the plasma would work as well if your not so concerned about the plasma screens output quality.

    Okay, so I've never tried such things before, so I am not talking from any kind of experience. But I can't conjure up a reason as to why you couldn't pull off what your aiming for.
     
  5. Michael D. Bunting

    Michael D. Bunting Screenwriter

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    Vince: Either way, one or both...as I think we could make do if it's just one of the monitors that displays on the plasma.

    I will talk to some folks in my workplace to see if they know anything, doubtful though [​IMG] .

    If all else fails, I'll just try it out (making sure any cables/splitters I buy are fully refundable).

    I will post back here with my findings in a week or so, if not sooner.

    Thanks for the help guys.
     
  6. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    To use the plasma as one of your monitors is pretty straightforward; if the plasma takes VGA/DVI, it would be dead simple. Otherwise, you're trying to get a computer to display on a TV, no magic there.

    But unless the plasma has a built-in split screen function and two sets of inputs, getting both displays on there at the same time would be impossible without specific hardware. There's no way a simple set of cables and splitters, in any combination, would work. It's like trying to take two separate pages from two books, and by pressing them together really hard, you hope something happens; it just doesn't work that way.

    Also, the plasma could be just ED instead of HD, in which case the resolution would be pretty low.
     
  7. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    Moment of Zen. . . I was rummaging through a computer store and all of a sudden it hit me. . . In the store they daisy chain their monitors off of one computer. All you would need to do is bug them as to what they use to daisy chain them. Then daisy chain a monitor and an input on the plasma.

    But that does require the plasma to support a side-by-side image, which I don't think is that uncommon for recent widescreen TVs. But then again dual RGB inputs might be. Either way, I don't think the resulting image will be spectaculatur, chopping a 720p monitor in half

    Well. . . do get back to us on the subject, I'm definately intrigued by this. After all it is a fun idea.
     
  8. Michael D. Bunting

    Michael D. Bunting Screenwriter

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    I'm going to be trying this out tomorrow guys.

    Th plasma can indeed handle VGA inputs (2) - as we already have one computer connected to it already. That computer does not (and will never) have Internet/LAN access though.

    What I do is brief airline/military pilots all day (I'm a Weather Forecaster in the Air Force) and the satellite and radar images available on the net are far superior to the ones that are being used today that we are paying big money for (actually, it's your tax dollars [​IMG] ).

    I want to eventually discontinue the service we use currently anyway and use something "in house" via the web.

    Thanks again for all your suggestions and discussion. I'll keep you all informed of what transpires from here on out.
     
  9. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Does the plasma monitor support picture in picture via the two RGB inputs? On my Mits 16x9 HDTV, some PiP modes show two sources side by side. Thus if I was running a dual-head machine and both cards had S-Video out, I could run them to two inputs on the TV and do this, but in poor quality. If your plasma has this kind of PiP ability you should be set.

    Other than that, I think you're kind of hosed. However there is this company that does do video cards for special applications. You should check out their site.
     
  10. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    I thought all plasma monitors were low resolution...720x480 right? If not, what is the highest resolutions you can get?

    I hope you're only using it to display video or huge stock-ticker symbols...browsing or reading documents would be a nightmare on a plasma TV. [​IMG]
     
  11. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Quite a few go higher. Seems like 1366x768 is common (oddball resolution...)
     
  12. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    Thanks Ken...my saliva glands are salivating!
     
  13. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    If anything else on you starts salivating, see a doctor [​IMG]
     

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