Do lots of Recievers overrate there wattage

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Allen Marshall, Apr 21, 2004.

  1. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Somethings been bothering me this morning. I have a Kenwood something or other reciever that came in a HTIB like 2 years ago and it's 100x5. I didnt buy the HTIB but i know it couldnt of cost more then $400 if even that, so why in the heck is the reciever so cheap when most other Recievers cost like $1,000 just to get 100wpc except Yamaha.

    This Kenwood thing can only make it to like -28 Master Volume and then it'll turn off if something big happens, i can get that volume at -22 Master Volume on my Yamaha and my yamaha will go down to -14 before it turns off (has to get hot first).

    Wanna know why the thing gives out so easy, -28 on the Kenwood is like 75-92db field from 3 meters away. Sayin a reciever can do more watts RMS then it really can suck! Also, whats with H/K, low watts, but very expensive?
     
  2. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    Some receivers do rate their power more "honestly" than others. Usually, when they "cheat", they give the power rating at 1 kHz, instead of over the entire frequency range.

    And there's a lot more to a receiver than power. Most of the time, you're only using one or two watts of power, so don't get too hung up about how much power your receiver can produce. I have a Sony DE-level receiver, which tends to get bashed around here, but it gives me plenty of power, since I rarely listen to movies over 15 dB below reference.

    Also, don't be preoccupied with what the volume number on your receiver. -28, -22, -14 ... these numbers don't mean anything from receiver to receiver. Keep in mind that speaker sensitivity, the size of your room, etc. will also have an effect on how loud your system can get.
     
  3. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Quality before quantity.

    To answer you question: More often that not they do overrate their receivers. Very few people actually realize this as they usually don't crank it.
     
  4. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    For sure take a look HERE for a look at some recent benchmark tests
     
  5. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    You can tell which receiver maker is trying to pull wool over your eyes. Look for the following giveaways:

    1) Output power rated at 1 KHz instead of the full bandwidth.

    2) Output power rated at 6 or 4 ohm load instead of 8 ohm load.

    3) Number of channels driven not specified. Usually that means the output power is for one or two channels driven, not all channels driven.

    4) Words like 'peak' power used instead of RMS power in the ratings.

    My 2 green cents.
     

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