DLP Projector or 65" RPTV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Barteaux, Nov 20, 2001.

  1. David Barteaux

    David Barteaux Stunt Coordinator

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    For roughly the same price of a 65" HDTV ready RPTV, I could get a DLP or LCD projector that can project a much larger image. What would be the best choice? Is there a major difference in picture quality with CRT's as opposed to the newer projectors that are hitting the market now?

    Thanks
     
  2. Micheal

    Micheal Screenwriter

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    CRT's have the best quality picture that you can get. I've owned an LCD PJ and I got very tired of the "screendoor" effect and dead pixels. DLP's are much better but a lot of people are affected by a "rainbow" of colour when looking from side to side while watching the screen.
    I now own a Marquee 8000 CRT Projector that can do 16x9 and HDTV. (Actually, it can do 2500 x 2000) My next step is getting it hooked up to a HTPC, I'm currently using a DVD player and a Line Doubler. It looks amazing but I'm really only using about a third of it's resolution. [​IMG]
    It's also the only PJ that can do true blacks! Don't let all this fool you though, you have to really be into HT to own one of these as they take a little work to get started. I started into CRT knowing absolutely nothing but I've learned a lot (still am everyday) and can honestly say that it really doesn't take much to get it going, just patience.
    They're big, they're bad but they've got the best picture and I'm glad! [​IMG]
    Good luck in your search...
     
  3. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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    But not all LCDs have screendoor problems nor everyone can see "rainbows" so my advice is to demo each technology and decide yourself. But in any case go with a FP system be it CRT, DLP, or LCD since its the only way to get the theater experience at home.

    Regards
     
  4. Micheal

    Micheal Screenwriter

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    I haven't seen an LCD unit that you couldn't see the screendoor effect on but maybe that's just me. They do ALL suffer from dead pixels though and that's a fact.
    And like I said, a lot of people see the rainbow effect while watching DLP but not everyone. If it doesn't bother you than you're in luck, just don't expect all of your guests not to notice.
    LCD & DLP give you an easy plug and play good quality picture with average blacks but you don't need a dark room to enjoy it.
    CRT gives you the BEST picture you can get with the best blacks but you must have controlled lighting and be willing to go through the initial setup.
    Check these out if you don't believe me...
    http://home.t-online.de/home/bjoern....or/page_01.htm
    I don't think Bjoern Roy will mind since they were posted in another Forum... [​IMG]
     
  5. Will

    Will Guest

    Getting back to the original question, which is whether

    to get a 65" RPTV or a DLP or LCD projector that projects

    into a much bigger area, as I understand it, many people

    get an RPTV when they can't control the ambiant light in

    their room. If you sometimes watch TV/DVD's during the day

    and some sunlight flows into your viewing room, you

    might want to get an RPTV. Otherwise, you might prefer

    a projector. Another difference which I guess is pretty

    obvious, is that a projector needs a place to project in

    the middle or back of the room, and you may or may not

    want a special screen in the front of the room, while

    a 65" RPTV sits in the front of the room, as a permanent

    piece of furniture, typically about 5 feet by 5 feet by

    2 1/2 feet, which sits there, whether it is in use or

    turned off. Also when turned off, some RPTVs when viewed

    straight-on, look a little like a 65" mirror, staring back

    at you.
     
  6. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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  7. Jim Robbins

    Jim Robbins Stunt Coordinator

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    I think another question must be asked when thinking of a FP and that is how many hours a week do you watch TV. CRT's in rear screen projectors can last 10,000hrs vs 1000-2000 hrs for high pressure lamps that cost $300-700 vs maybe 1000 to 2000hrs on front projector CRT's that cost well over a $1000. I found the best overall solution was a 27" for everything but DVD's which I use my Boxlight 455. That should give a much lower cost of operation figure.
     
  8. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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    A great idea indeed. It will be nice to know which are your viewing preferences, mostly DVDs, 4:3,etc in order to have better suggestions.

    Regards
     
  9. Micheal

    Micheal Screenwriter

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  10. Jim Robbins

    Jim Robbins Stunt Coordinator

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    A Rear projector's CRT's are loafing to send an image a few feet to a lens screen. The Front projector is running near flat out to project a large image (84" or greater) on a low gain screen. I was quoting from a Madrigal ad on their IDLA projector but Barco list CRT's lifespan at 4000 to 7000. All projector lamps and CRT's lifespans are listed at the 50% mark.
     
  11. Micheal

    Micheal Screenwriter

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    Trust me, your quote of 1000 to 2000 hours for a CRT FP is flat out wrong. If you won't take my word for it just visit the CRT Forum over at http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forum...?s=&forumid=16 they'll set you straight. [​IMG]
    Not trying to be rude, just trying to be accurate..
     
  12. bryan_chow

    bryan_chow Agent

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    The CRTs in front projectors are typically rated to last 10,000 hours. Here's a pic from my Sony 1272Q with 1800 hours (obviously the tubes are still fine):
    [​IMG]
    If you can deal with the size, weight and complexity (setup and convergence) and don't mind buying used they're clearly the best deal. You can easily find them for less than 10% of their original prices (around $20K!).
    Bryan
     
  13. Will

    Will Guest

     
  14. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    I think I can best tackle the question on whether to get a pj or RPTV. I had the NEC LT150 first. Loved the picture, no rainbows for me and just adore the 8' screen. But I started counting the hours on the lamp and found that I couldn't regulate ambient light all that well. We ended up selling it and getting a 65" RPTV. Now, I believe we enjoy the set, our TV shows and our movies.

    Oh and BTW, the pj was about $1000 less than the TV.
     
  15. Will

    Will Guest

    With regard to ambient light, I understand some FP's are

    brighter than others. The LT150 generates I believe, 800 lumens

    but other front projector generate over 1000 lumens.
     
  16. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Auditioning

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    I'm in the market for a new DILA projector (which, IMHO, can be superior to LCD and DLP after proper calibration) ...
    I am aware of the ambient light problem during days in a living room ... My plan is to have a 7' or 8' screen mounted on the wall above a 27" TV set in low-profile TV cabinet (so the bottom of the screen is at sofa viewing level). Projector for DVD during evenings and nights, and television during the day or for TV shows.
     
  17. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    IMHO, almost regardless of the lumen rating on a projector, you need to have pretty good light control in the room you plan to watch it in. The screen is, after all, white - and the black level you can achieve is compromised when there is ambient light in the room.
     

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