DLP owners... how do you watch "extra features"?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by MarcoBiscotti, Nov 16, 2005.

  1. MarcoBiscotti

    MarcoBiscotti Producer

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    To those of us with projection setups, I'm curious how you view special features - especially on sets with many extras in varying film and video and aspect ratios?

    Do you just watch them in the same ratio as the feature film, or do you struggle to adjust each and every interview, making-of, documentary, etc. in it's specific apparent a.r. and if so - how do you determine?
     
  2. Yumbo

    Yumbo Cinematographer

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    set your player to auto.
     
  3. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    My DVD player can adjust on the fly, based on the Aspect Ratio flags encoded on the disc.

    Just about any good DVD player will do this. My Panasonic RP91, purchased in 2001, does this.
     
  4. MarcoBiscotti

    MarcoBiscotti Producer

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    Well I use my video scaler to adjust for the proper aspect ratio. I've got my pj mapped at 1:1 and manually select the source input and desired output of any image scale. So auto selecting the frame ratio on my player won't help. I was just curious what others with similar setups do?
     
  5. Michael Osadciw

    Michael Osadciw Screenwriter

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    I have to manually change things when I care to (in my DVD player - btw the same thing applies to LCD without auto aspect ratio functions). The only thing that sucks about Front Projection is the limited bulb life. I feel like I'm wasting the bulb life on features...so sometimes I'll take them to the good old direct-view CRT.

    Mike
     
  6. LarryH

    LarryH Supporting Actor

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    I have no way to view non-anamorphically encoded video on my LCD FP, so, as suggested above, I have to go to my small 4x3 RP for extras. Unfortunately, this means I usually never get around to watching them, except on 4x3 titles.
     
  7. MarcoBiscotti

    MarcoBiscotti Producer

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    I'd do the same, but unfortunately I have no other viewing source right now. It's not a big deal, but as I said I was just curious how others deal with this. I think in future I'll hold off for the most part until I can afford a flat screen for my bedroom because I feel the same way about bulb life. Thanks for the feedback.
     
  8. Brian PB

    Brian PB Supporting Actor

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    My two-and-a-half-year-old InFocus X1 allows me to select any one of three output settings on the fly: full-frame, 16:9, and "native" (which is used for non-anamorphic widescreen). If I'm not sure of the aspect ratio or anamorphic status, I cycle through all three. Typically, one setting "looks right."

    This is one reason (out of many) that I love my front projector: the ability to change the output to suit the film.
     
  9. TheLongshot

    TheLongshot Producer

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    Depends on what I'm watching. Aspect ratio isn't much of a problem with an HTPC. For most things, execpt for non-anamorphic widescreen, it autoadjusts. For non-ananmorphic, I just zoom in.

    It is all about if it is worth spending bulb life on it...

    Jason
     

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