1. I found this quote a web site comparing display technologies:

    "DLP is the world's only all-digital display technology, from start to finish. That means when you have a DLP TV with a DVI or HDMI input, the video signal will remain digital all the way until it is displayed on the screen, contrary to LCD and Plasma displays in which a digital signal will be transformed to analog in the last step."

    http://features.teamxbox.com/xbox/14...de-to-HDTV/p1/

    I was unaware of this, although I agree that DLP can produce some of the cleanest pictures around with unreal color (in a positive way).

    The drawback for me is that I generally don't like the look of RP pictures because bright areas often show 'screen glitter' which immediately takes me out of the experience

    I've waited this long, so I'm probably holding out for a ~50-inch 1080p set.

    I like the 'idea' of an all-digital display, but so far direct-view LCDs & Plasmas look better most of the time (despite analog hit).
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    It is purely PDM/PWM in nature, so in some sense yes I suppose that's correct.


    Why? The inherent nature of the display has little bearing whatsoever on the image quality. Having more "digital" operation in the reproduction chain has no bearing whatsoever on the relevant issues of imaging and how you judge a quality image. There is nothing wrong with moving back into the analog domain. People who automatically assume that "digital" is inherently superior are usually technically uninformed or are not that versed in engineering at all. Then they go on to make statements that digital is necessarily better because, after all it's "digital" (as if that means anything at all), or the reverse, people who go on saying that analog is always superior because analog signals are not quantized therefore have unlimited capabilities (which is nonsense based on very crude and ignorant understanding).

    The bottom line is that the domain(s) the display predominantly operates means nothing. Rather, the performance of the displays is the relevant question, not to what degree it is or is not a digital display.

    So back to your statement, there is no logical reason to prefer the "idea" of an all-digital display technology on any grounds that that attribute would necessarily make for a better display.

    High end CRTs which are heavily analog in nature are still the reference displays, so the notion that if you digitize everything that the image then MUST for some reason be superior is absurd.
     
  3. I won't presume to argue with you, but the preponderance of 'consumer education' regarding the DTV transition has emphasized the inherent advantage of digital signals coupled with digital displays.

    I also recall a lot of talk on these forums about reducing signal conversions and the general concept of analog=bad.

    If I am a fool to have accepted these concepts, then surely I have had ample encouragement.

    But I think what you're suggesting is 'let your eyes be the judge, not technobabble'.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Not completely. There is still a great deal of technobabble with regards to quantifying a display's performance, but slapping an **look it's DIGITAL!!!** sticker on something does not make it better. Unfortunately, as is illustrated often, that kind of shallow understanding can sell products, and that certainly seeps into how people are "educated" about things because of the difficulty of separating the marketing smokescreen from the engineering and objective background.
     
  5. Edwin-S

    Edwin-S Producer
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    Wouldn't SED panels essentially be ''all digital" in nature? BTW, has anyone ever seen one of those things in action? If so, how do they look? Similar to CRT?
     

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