DIY Tool List / or What do I need?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kerry Hackney, Mar 12, 2002.

  1. Kerry Hackney

    Kerry Hackney Stunt Coordinator

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    Another post got me to thinking that a lot of would be DIYers may have no idea the minimum list of tools that they either need to own or have access to. I thought I would start a list with some estimated costs and see if we can come up with a usable index.

    If we assume that this is for a onetime sub builder or someone who wants to build 4 of 5 speakers can we agree that you won't have to buy DeWalt or high end tools? Let's start with minimums. That way, a builder can always decide to spend more for tools.

    Skil Saw $45

    40 tooth carbide blade $15

    Clamp on edge guide $45 or home made for $10

    Router... may be optional if you are painting with textured paints and you don't want to recess the drivers....ie a sub.

    jig saw... if you don't use a router

    clamps ... bar clamps run 10 to 20 each depending on length I would guess a minimum of 4

    screw drivers

    pliers

    wire cutters / strippers

    ????
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Power drill and bits

    Power screwdriver

    Power sander (orbital, belt - your choice)

    Hammer (you never know!)

    (I highly recommend the plunge router, and a carbide tipped spiral upcut bit if you plan on using MDF).
     
  3. Kerry Hackney

    Kerry Hackney Stunt Coordinator

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    I'll second the drill with bits... 30 to $40 if you go cheap...
    Power screwdriver ??? ... optional / you can also use the drill if you are careful or the old fasioned kind
    Power sander??? ... optional but they make life easier.
    Hammer .... OK $8
    Come on Pat, a little elbow grease won't hurt. [​IMG]
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I'm too old to be sweating when I screw...in screws.
     
  5. Kerry Hackney

    Kerry Hackney Stunt Coordinator

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    You're killing me... ROTFL [​IMG]
    Don't talk to me about old... I've got socks older than you. Besides, today is my birthday.
     
  6. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Guys,

    Speaking of edge guides for a circular saw(I don't have a table saw), where can I get a cheap one, or how can I build on that is accurate. I used some MDF pannels on my previous project and found that they weren't exactly straight. Any suggestions how to make a perfectly straight one?
     
  7. Kevin Deacon

    Kevin Deacon Second Unit

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    Soldering iron
     
  8. Kerry Hackney

    Kerry Hackney Stunt Coordinator

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  9. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Kerry, Happy Birthday! And I feel very very sorry for those socks. Put them out of their misery, dude!
     
  10. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Kerry,

    I just bought a set of those Tru-grip clamps a few weeks ago at the woodworking show here in Atlanta! I got the 24", 36", and 50" clamp and tool guides and two of the back to back clamps.

    The 50" clamp is perfect for cross cutting plywood or MDF in half with a skil saw. After that all your dimensions are small enough to use the 50" clamp for all your cuts.

    Brian
     
  11. Kerry Hackney

    Kerry Hackney Stunt Coordinator

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    Brian- Yep, I have the Tru-grip also. I made a couple of sets of guide blocks to make set up go faster. You have to allow for the shoe of the saw when you use these so make a block of wood the spaces the guide the correct distance from the cut line. I make my marks where I want to cut and then use those little spring clamps to clamp the blocks to the line. Slide the clamp guide up to the block and clamp it in place. That way, I don't have to fool with all of the measuring every time... [​IMG] I made a set for the short side of the saw shoe also.
     
  12. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    What are those tru-grip clamps?
     
  13. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    router circle jig...$0-50

    compass, 1/2" pvc arm type...$5

    tape measure...priceless

    shop vac...not required but double priceless
     
  14. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Jeff Lam,

    These are the clamps that Kerry provided the link for above. You can use them like bar clamps but also as tool guides for a skil saw, router, etc.

    Brian
     
  15. David A. Frattaroli

    David A. Frattaroli Stunt Coordinator

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    If I may add my two cents: I think a router is a must. One of the easiest yet most important design considerations when building speakers is to recess the drivers. At least the tweeters. As far as the tweeters are concerned, this may be just as important as getting the box size, crossover frequency or damping right. Yes, it's harder to do because you have to first route out the larger, shallow hole and then route through for the actual driver diameter but it's worth it. Plus, it also makes trimming the veneer at the driver openings a little more time consuming. Add to that, that if your driver flange isn't a perfect circle, now you need to make a template for the odd shape: it could be a more daunting task. But, with a little practice on some scrap wood, you'll get it right.

    Also, if you're going to go buy a table saw for this type of work, I'd suggest models that have miter channels on the table surface (for using miter gauges and other jigs) as oppose to a sliding table fixture. Simply because, it's a more popular style table and if you get serious about woodworking, you'll have access to more DIY jigs for the miter channel (T-slot) type tables.

    Spend a few extra dollars and get one blade for rip-cuts (along the grain) and one blade for cross-cuts (across the grain). Typically, rip-blades have fewer teeth (24) versus cross-cut blades (80). If you're going to be using MDF only, you might be better off with more (than fewer) teeth. Say at least 60. The cut edge will be smoother. I use Freud blades and they are worth the extra money.

    Get a good quality breather with replaceable filters. You'll be making a ton of dust and the stains and finishes etc aren't great to be breathing too much of. The best $35 you'll ever spend. The paper masks with rubber-band straps are useless.

    I could go on but I'll stop here.
     
  16. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    A table saw with a high-end blade for accurate cuts. Also, the blade and miter slot must be parallel - it's a hassle, but it can be adjusted. Accurate, 90 degree cuts are important so that you have no gaps to fill after assembly. I also highly recommend band clamps (I use the Merle clamps from MLCS)to hold cabinets square during glue drying. And, as I have said many times, I never nail or screw cabinets. Accurate cuts give you parts that fit together correctly and carpenters glue will provide all the joint strength you need; actually, the joints will be stronger than the wood itself. I recommend a good router also. I have a couple of hand-helds and a monster Freud mounted in my router table. If you don't have a table saw and don't have other uses for one that would help you justify the expense, have a friend/relative do the cuts for you, or pay a cabinet shop to do them. If you do have a friend who has one, you might think about buying them a good blade in exchange for access to their saw (learn how to use it safely, BTW).

    The Jasper circle jigs are worth every penny they cost.
     
  17. david spin

    david spin Auditioning

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  18. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    Dremel, fiberglass cutting disc, dremel router table (makes very fine detail cuts), and sand drummer.

    graph paper (makes drawing to scale in a garage environment much easier)

    pencil

    double stick tape (1001 uses)

    duct tape

    broom wisk or blower (dusts off work for instant appraisal)

    for parents: kids (best clean up tool I've seen though must be guided more than most, quite loud, and also quite expensive)
     

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