DIY sub questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon_R, Feb 1, 2001.

  1. Jon_R

    Jon_R Stunt Coordinator

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    This is laughable, honest. I have a dual voice coil sub in excellent condition that needs a home. However, its made be the finest producers of speakers, Radio Shack. [​IMG] I did not buy this speaker, It was given to me (thankfully) about 4 years ago. My setup is low end polk audio, r10, cs175, junk surround on a de445 sony amp. I will soon have the r40s most likely, they will replace r10 for main and send the r10 to surround. My question is this: Is a DIY sub cost efficient or is it really just for a fine tuned HT of a more expensive nature? If i don't go w/ a DIY sub, its looking like the sony sa-wm40 is likely.
    Thanks
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  2. Robert Silge

    Robert Silge Agent

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    I made my DIY sub before my main speakers even had a name on them (they were collge kid generic pawn shop style). Clearly that ain't finely tuned HT. But being a broke college kid, DIY was the most cost effective route. It is FAR cheaper than buying a comparable sub. Of course the axiom holds true... time is money. If you have an excess of one, make a DIY sub. If you have an excess of the other, buy an SVS or something.
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    -Rob
    "People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid."
    --Soren Kierkegaard
     
  3. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    well lets see,
    imho, building a sub is the way to get the best bang for the buck to add to your HT. it will tie all your other equipment together and bring a realism to movies you didnt even know was there. need proof, try listening to U-571 without and then with a sub. even if it is a rat shack driver, what did it cost you?, nada. a sheet of mdf is about $15 and an amp to drive it is about $100-150...and that's for a pretty good amp that can be used if you decide to upgrade to a better driver later. the latest flyer from PE has a 150 watt or so amp for $89. at one time i had speakers from 4 different manufacturers in my HT at the same time...polk, def tech, solid, and B&W. far from a finely tuned HT. since then (and about 2K mis-spent dollars) i have worked my way up to a set of B&W Nautilus. even at that level, i cant bring myself to buy a sub from a dealer..DIY, for me, is the way.
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    *why build one when you can build two for twice the price*
    jeff
     
  4. Rick Steverson

    Rick Steverson Auditioning

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    Any system could sound most impressive with a subwoofer. I think most of us believe it's cost effective when we start the DIY approach with a single driver/plate amp design. Wiht a possible average cost of $300-400 for a Shiva/plate amp design, you can find cheaper subs, but they are not in the same league of these DIY projects. Those that go the multiple drivers/mega-watt amps for state of the art design still talk cost effective, even as some question their sanity [​IMG]
    Jon, you can use the DIY approach with what you have to control your cash. If you use the Radio Shack driver, build a cabinet/sonotube and buy an plate amp, you get a sub with only the investment of maybe $50-100 for materials for the cabinet or sonotube and $100-200 for a plate. Later, you could upgrade to a Shiva or some long-excursion driver for another $120, reuse the amp and possibly reuse or rebuild the enclosure, and get the extra bass that Radio Shack's driver doesn't have.
     
  5. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    I think it's important to rein in one's expectations when orphan parts are used in DIY projects.
    You need find out how much performance you can squeeze out of the components and evaluate whether it would be worthwhile to pursue DIY designs/projects.
    Now if you are in position to totally spec out a design and have the financial resources to make it happen, I think DIY can produce great results for less money it would cost to obtain comparable results with retail products.
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    PatCave ; HT Pix ; Gear ; Sunosub I + III ; DVDs ; LDs
     

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