DIY circle jig

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by tom_furman, Aug 16, 2002.

  1. tom_furman

    tom_furman Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok...I saw a link on here with a nifty DIY circle jig using plexi glass. I copied it and it works great!
    BUT
    It can't make 6" circles. the base on both my routers is 3" meaning if I set the pivot point right against the router it would be a bit over 6" at best (more like 7"). I saw the smaller Jasper Jig (www.jasperaudio.com) and it can make circles from 1"-7 1/2". I cant get a good look at how it is made, and how it attaches to the router? Any ideas? how did you guys cut your holes for your ports?
     
  2. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Tom,

    The Jasper Jigs have holes drilled in the bottom of the jig beneath the router's base. This is how you can make holes smaller than the diameter of the base.

    Brian
     
  3. tom_furman

    tom_furman Stunt Coordinator

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    I can see the holes in the bottom of the jig on the small picture they provide on the web site.
    Has anyone copied this jig?
    [​IMG]
    If not...how else can I get a 6" circle?[
     
  4. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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  5. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Tom,
    I don't know if you copied mine or not [​IMG] but I made it with the intent on cutting larger circles for the endcaps in my sonosubs. I bought a Jasper Jig for the smaller driver and port cutouts. The Jasper allows for more repeatable results due to the 1/16" increments. However by the same token it restricts those super fine adjustments that are possible with a sliding type arrangement.
     
  6. Ron D Core

    Ron D Core Stunt Coordinator

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    If your router has a base plate that comes off, juts trace it on some 1/4" MDF and cut it out with some of it overhanging the base. The just push a 3/4" straight bit through the wood while its attached and there you go, a jig that can cut down to or mortise about a 2" hole.
     
  7. Paul_C

    Paul_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Ron has the right idea.
    I usually take leftover 3/8" plywood or mdf which I attach to the bottom of the router and then plunge a straight bit right through. I then use a finish nail I cut in half and use this as the pivot point. I hammer it in from the bottom of the router (wen I need holes that are smaller than the router base) but not all the way through. This way you can make any size hole you want. The limiting factor is the size of the straightbit you are using. I used this method to cut a 1" hole for a tweeter. It doesn't really cost anything either.
    Another tip is to make the hole for the bit a little bigger than the bit. This allows material to exit from the cut. This will prevent the bit from recutting the material. I found this out the hard way when a carbide tipped bit went dull very quickly. [​IMG]
    Paul.
     
  8. ChrisAttebery

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    Guys,

    Try to us the smallest bit possible to unload the router and the bit. You will remove less material and the bits will last longer.


    Paul,

    If you get a 1/4" solid carbide spiral upcut bit it shouldn't have a problem loading up and dulling even with a zero clearance insert.



    Chris
     
  9. Paul_C

    Paul_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Good advice Chris. I was using a straight bit which didn't clear the waste all that well.

    Paul.
     

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