DIY Cables and Interconnects

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by AlexKunec, Jun 16, 2002.

  1. AlexKunec

    AlexKunec Stunt Coordinator

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    From reading previous posts ive come up with this:
    There is huge difference between low and high quality RCA interconnects.
    There is little difference between low and highly priced speaker wires of the same thickness. However many people do believe that high quality speaker wires make a big difference.

    Am i right with these two statements?
    Also do banana connectors improve sound quality? Some claim that on a copper to gold connection (without bananas) a layer of copper oxide forms around the copper, which degrades sound. But with bananas it is gold to gold. Perfect. But isn't the copper wire just crimped onto the gold connector? Wouldn't the copper oxidate at that location instead?
     
  2. Jeff Mills

    Jeff Mills Stunt Coordinator

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    I personally beleive that there is nothing better than bare wire for your speakers. Bananas and spades only add an additional crimp/solder/break in the wire. I beleive bananas and spades only purpose is for convienience.

    I dont understand how people can say that the connectors prevent corrosion as, like you said, they simply corrode in a different location....the crimp.

    I also recommend that when using bare wire, that the end of the wire be heated to melt the end of the stripped insulation. This will seal the end of the wire airtight and help prevent corrosion along the wire under the insulation.

    Thats just mt 2 cents.
     
  3. Kevin Deacon

    Kevin Deacon Second Unit

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    Put a coating of silver solder on the bare wire. This not only seals the wire from corrosion, but prevents the strands from fraying.
     

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