DIY Accoustic Panel Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrew Beacom, Sep 14, 2002.

  1. Andrew Beacom

    Andrew Beacom Supporting Actor

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    I've been doing some research and have decided to build a couple of panels to go in front of my RPTV when I'm listening to music. Basically using the Jon Risch/AudioWorx spec's.

    I haven't been able to locate Rock wool so I'm just going to use the pegboard method. Is there a reason to use pegboard and not regular board?

    Haven't found hardware cloth yet either. There's a serious hardware store I haven't tried though. Would "fly screen" material be a valid substitute? It should allow the sound to pass through and be easier to work with than hardware cloth.

    I also haven't found a huge selection in Burlap colors. Muslin looks easier to work with and it's cheaper. Is there a big difference accoustically? How does one fix the burlap to the frame without leaving unfinished edges that will pull apart? I figured the easiest way would be to fold it back on itself and then staple.

    At the moment I'm planning to lean the panels against the top bezel of the TV. If the panels too heavy I may have to look at leg supports. Anyone done this?

    TIA.
     
  2. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    I use the pegboard because it 'breathes'

    IMO muslin works fine, Jon Risch may disagree.....

    Any of the big home center stores will have hardware cloth. Metal window screen isn't stiff enough to compress the fiberglass and hold it in place without bulging in the middle.

    If you're trying to keep the weight down use 1"X4"s and 1/8" pegboard.

    Dennis J made legs for his panels by attaching wooden shelf brackets. large "L" brackets will work too
     
  3. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    Check out this link it, it says he used Muslin. I doubt there's a huge difference.
    That compressed fiberglass panel that guy used is basically rock wool. I think it would be found at stores that sell insulation for walls/pipes/ etc.
    I think the pegboard has holes for sound to pass through. If the board was solid then the sound waves would bounce back and forth between the wall and the board.
    As for the assembly, I suppose you could first wrap the burlap (or muslin) around the 2x4s and staple them to the frame. Then screw/install the pegboard over the stapled burlap. Then there'd be no visible staples or burlap edges.
    The way I plan on installing mine was to hang them from the ceiling with string or using four 4" long legs at each corner of the panel into the wall. What you could also do is use two legs at the top of the panel and attach those to the wall and use thin stilts to the floor to hold the weight. (A dowel might work)
    They arn't going to be that heavy, I plan on building mine next week.
     
  4. Andrew Beacom

    Andrew Beacom Supporting Actor

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    Thomas,

     
  5. Serge Breton

    Serge Breton Supporting Actor

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    my suggestion is as follows. I purchased 2 studiofoam 4x8 sheet from auralex acoustics then built some 2'x4' frame out of 2x3's, placed the cut studiofoam into the frame then wrapped the panels with the Guilford of Maine fabric(same fabric tha ASC uses in all their products). The Guilford fabric is a little pricey but the finished look and performance of these panels match all the commercial offerings out there. I highly recommend auralex to anyone, and their client list speaks for itself......
    here's the link:
    www.auralex.com
    and no i have no affiliation with this manufacturer [​IMG]
     
  6. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Andrew
    All three Lowes stores near me have hardware cloth. It's back where they have fencing materials, dog runs, etc.
    Serge
    You're right Auralex is very nice stuff, not all that good for low bass. I have a friend that is using a ton of it in addition to some DIY panels for his HT, but it's pricy.... They offer a great selection of colors though [​IMG]
     
  7. Aaron_Smith

    Aaron_Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    When I went down this decision making path for my home studio, I ended up with the Auralex sheets too. After the cost of materials and the time to make DIY panels, they aren't that much more expensive. They are very easy to work with.
    Regarding low bass, none of these panels will be all that effective because they are not thick enough. Corner bass traps are most effective for the low frequencies; I have the thick foam ones from Auralex that work well, I've also heard that diaphragm and hemholtz designs work well.
    Be sure to balance absorption with diffusion; too much absorption and the room will sound unnaturally quiet and damp. Acoustic treatment can be a huge improvement for a sound system but you have to know what you're doing and be willing to experiment.
     
  8. Andrew Beacom

    Andrew Beacom Supporting Actor

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    Thomas,

    I haven't located it at Lowes yet but I have at Menards and another hardware shop. I've been checking insulation options and the places that have smaller amounts, less than 25', seem to charge you for it. So it look like I'll end up getting more than I'll need.

    Is there a reason to use the faced insulation? I saw some gutter protection made out of a heavy plastic that looked like it would work to keep the insulation flat. Although the hardware cloth looks easy enough to work with.

    I'm toying with the idea of putting some support legs on the bottom so that the panels are free standing. I figured that wooden shelf brackets might look good. What I don't know is how wide the support would need to be for a 48" x 19" panel? Any ideas? Or trial and error perhaps?
     

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