Divx ?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by heather p, Dec 3, 2001.

  1. heather p

    heather p Auditioning

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    I've seen some DivX players and discs for sale - wondering if they would still work? Does anyone know what happened to the capability after Circuit City stopped selling the models?

    Does anyone know where I can get a "registered" working Divx player? I am new to the technology - PULLEAZE help

    thanks.
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    DIVX is deceased, and no one is mourning it. If you have a DIVX player, I presume it will still play DVDs. But as far as DIVX discs are concerned, I'm pretty sure you're out of luck.

    M.
     
  3. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    Heather,
    Try the Divx owner's assoc. site www.the-doa.com . They specialize in trying to make such machines work. Divx died about 2 years ago and the company stopped supporting playback mode last summer. I'm guessing that you probably can't start from scratch at this late a date. On the other hand people around here had nice things to say about the Proscan Divx player as a DVD player, although as time progresses the new DVD players keep getting better. Oh yeah and welcome to HTF. We can talk your ear off about such things......
     
  4. Robert Floto

    Robert Floto Supporting Actor

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    Heather,
    I noticed that you called it DivX...
    There are actually two products titled divx (one is Divx the other is DivX).
    The first Divx was the store-bought disc with a movie on it (these ones are in a professional CD case with the DIVX logo on them), and the way they work is that you purchase one of these discs, and you can play it anytime you want, as many times as you want, within a 24 hour period. After that, whenever you want to view it again, you will be charged a little over $3.00 for another 24 hour viewing period. The way this was accomplished was with a DVD player with a modem attached for billing...
    This Divx has gone out of business, but their contract allowed people who had active Divx accounts (the only way you can play a Divx disc, period) to continue "buying" new viewing periods until their billing service's cut-off date of June 30, 2001 (though discs continued to be playable until July 8th)...which is close to exactly two years after Divx discontinued selling their discs in stores.
    The DivX discs you can play on your computer are something different entirely. This DivX (note the capital X in the logo) is a video compression technology that compresses digital video so it can be downloaded over DSL or cable modems in a relatively short time with no reduced visual quality. If one of these DivX compressed files is put on a CD ROM disc, it can be played with great quality on a computer...but not a player (Divx, DVD or otherwise).
    There are always a few online auctions with Divx (not the computer ones) movies and players. As mentioned previously, the Divx players make fine DVD players, but the Divx movies are only good for drink coasters at this point in time.
     
  5. Robert Dunnill

    Robert Dunnill Second Unit

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  6. Greg Robertson

    Greg Robertson Stunt Coordinator

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    Heather,

    Even if you could get a working DivX player, most all the movies were pan'n'scan and devoid of extras (if my memory is working correctly). It just doesn't seem worthwhile to pursue the format.
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    One can always use old Divx discs as coasters.

    As for the machines--my goodness, we now live in the era of the $300 msrp prog-scan DVD-Video player.

    Man, wasn't Divx fun to hate?
     

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