displaying non-anamorphic dvds anamorphically on 16:9 tvs

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Kevin*Kerouac, May 8, 2004.

  1. Kevin*Kerouac

    Kevin*Kerouac Auditioning

    May 4, 2004
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    i'm a layman in this field.

    are there tv's or devices that can enhance non-anamorphic widescreen dvds to be properly displayed on a 16:9 tv to appear like an anamorphic dvd. if not could tv's or special software or hardware eventually be produced to provide this luxury?
  2. greg_t

    greg_t Screenwriter

    Jan 18, 2001
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    Certain dvd players have the ability to "scale" non-anamaphoric dvd's. One such player, and probably the most well known, is the Panasonic RP91. Though it is now discontinued, it shouldn't be hard to find one.

    The 91 looks at the flags on a dvd to determine if it is anamaphoric or not. If it is, it does nothing to the image. If it is non-anamaphoric, it will scale the image to 16x9 and send it to the TV. This can only be done with the 91 in progressive out mode. For dvd's that are non-anamaphoric and are improperly flagged, the 91 can force scaling. This is a feature many of the other scaling players don't have. Many of the others depends on the flags on the dvd being correct, and many times, they are not correct. Keep in mind that this will NOT make a non-anamaphoric dvd the same quality as true anamaphoric, but it does usually improve the image over using your TV's zoom modes.

    The benefit to the 91's scaling is that you leave your TV in it's full, or 16x9 mode where there are more scan lines closer together. You do not have to use zoom modes. The downside is that the 91 does not have the best progressive scan output. I have two RP91's and I love them. For anamaphoric dvd's, I use the 91's interlaced output, which is among the best of all dvd players, into my 16x9 and let it convert to 480p. When I play a non-anamaphoric dvd, I put the 91 into progressive mode so I can use the scaling. scan output. It was made in both black and champagne colors. Hope this helps.
  3. Andy_Hamric

    Andy_Hamric Stunt Coordinator

    Apr 14, 2004
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    I just got a 46" sony rptv yesterday. I told my dvd player I had a 16:9 tv, and for anamorphic dvds I put my tv on "full" mode (this is the mode that if it receives a 4:3 image, it will making everything look uniformly short and fat). I also just bought Titanic for cheap, which is non-anamorphic. To make it look like the size and aspect (but not quite the same quality) of the anamorphic, I set the TV to zoom mode. This mode zooms such that the width of the 4:3 frame takes up the entire screen and the height is cropped.... of course in the case of letterbox Titanic all it's doing is cropping letterboxing.

    Anamorphic sure was a good idea, wasn't it?

    Ah, I see that Greg mentioned zoom on the TV. Greg's method is undoubtedly better quality, but if you don't have his feature on your DVD, you can use zoom on your TV. If you don't have one or the other you're out of luck I think.
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Aug 19, 2002
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    Anamorphic or not has nothing to do with the aspect ratio as it is displayed. An anamorphic DVD that uses the same aspect ratio of anon-anamorphic DVD, should display exactly the same when displayed correctly. You may need to change modes between the two, but they should *not* appear different, or you are doing something wrong.

    Also, anamorphic is not synonomous to widescreen.

    So I'm a little confused by the goal of the question...
  5. Dmitry

    Dmitry Supporting Actor

    Nov 30, 1998
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    Chris, this (AFAIK) is what Kevin is looking for.
    To display a non-anamorphic DVD "as anamorphic" means that instead of using the Zoom mode on TV, the Zoom is performed by the DVD player. In actuality, DVD player like the mentioned Panasonic 91 performs "upscaling". If you look at anamorphic widescreen DVD vs. non-anamorphic one (for a 1.78:1 film), you'll see that anamorphic has 480 lines of "picture information", while non-anamorphic has only 360, the remaining 120 lines are occupied by black bars. What Panny's "upscaling" does is it throws away the 120 black lines, processes the remaining 360 and inserts 120 lines of "picture information", which is actually derived from the existing ones. The result: an "anamorphic" picture.

  6. I really wish all players had this option since about 5-10% of my collection is non-anamorphic.

    Too bad the same scaler that converts 16x9 to 4:3 (if needed) can't do the reverse as well.

    Still hoping that some superplayer will emerge which will upconvert/scale all 4:3 & 16x9 encoded transfers to either 720p or 1080i for modern HD sets.

    I'd really like to have a combination of hardware in the future (player & display) that makes the absolute most of all my existing software.
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Nov 1, 1998
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    >>> superplayer ... which will upconvert/scale ... to either 720p or 1080i ...

    Today you can use an ordinary interlaced DVD player with component outputs, and a Lumagen Vision video processor. This will rival the best progressive scan players and in addition make non-anamorphic letterbox programs look almost as good as anamorphic ones using scaling (as mentioned above) and make 720p or 1080i output.

    You do need to spend USD $1000. for this Lumagen unit, there are probably other brands that do the same thing for more or less money that I have not auditioned.

    Video hints:
  8. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?

    Dec 1, 1999
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    Disney World and Universal Florida
    Real Name:
    Tony D.

    greg i would like to see how that looks.
    i have a 91 and a mits 73713.

    could you send me an email or just post here how you do that?
    what your connections are?

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