DirectTV reception through trees?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff R., Aug 18, 2001.

  1. Jeff R.

    Jeff R. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 31, 1999
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been wanting to get DirectTV for some time now but I have hesitated because my house is surrounded by a fair amount of trees. I was curious how much the trees will affect the reception quality? Mounting the dish in the trees probably isn't an option and they are too tall to mount the dish above them. I don't want to fork over the money for a system only to find out I can't get decent reception.
     
  2. Evan A

    Evan A Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2000
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am in the same predicament. I have found out that Circut City and the Good Guys are still offering free install. If the installer can't get a signal you can return the equipment for a full refund.
    Nota Bene: All my recearch has been on DirecTIVO units so it may be different for normal units
    ------------------
    --------------------
    Evan Adams
    [email protected]
    --------------------
     
  3. Larry Schneider

    Larry Schneider Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 1999
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't despair. All you need is a clear space in the treetops to get the signal. I had to run 75 feet of cable to find a clear spot.
     
  4. Jeff R.

    Jeff R. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 31, 1999
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    It looks like I may have found a clear spot. I went ahead and bought a system and will know for sure in the next week or two when they come to install it.
     
  5. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 1997
    Messages:
    7,061
    Likes Received:
    0
    Some things that would mitigate against you mounting a dish in the trees (besides the inconvenience involved) would be
    [*]The movement of the tree. You need a rock solid mount (my pole is imbedded in 39" of concrete) perfectly vertical and with no sway. Otherwise your signal will keep getting dropped.
    [*] The growth of the trees. Once mounted, you would constantly have to monitor tree growth as this would change the position of the dish realtive to the satellite(s).
    Like I said, not an option.
    Also, make sure you are aware that measuring signal strength when there are no leaves on the trees produces a different result than measuring in the summer. I know people who did an install in the winter only to find they lost signal come spring. The leaves will fail you in many cases.
    ------------------
    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     
  6. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 8, 2000
    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have to disagree that tree mounting is not an option. It certainly is not a preferred or recommended option, but sometimes it is the easiest.
    I have two dishes which needed to be mounted at 25 - 30 feet to clear trees in the signal path. A 30ft mast is not only expensive, but the mast would have to be stayed in three directions from a point about 2/3 of the mast height to prevent sway. These stays would be anchored a considerable distance from the mast - very much in the way.
    My solution was to tree-mount.
    Here are some tips for tree mounting:
    Choose a mature tree (older trees don't grow as fast);
    Mount on the trunk, not on a branch (less sway);
    Do not mount more than 2/3 up the tree (less sway);
    Choose a tree sheltered from prevailing storm winds, if possible;
    You may need to cut branches above and below your mount;
    Leave a coil of cable at the base of the tree to allow growth.
    I have been tree mounted for about 5 years. Growth is usually not a factor if the tree is growing straight, and you provide a cable coil at the base of the tree for slack.
    Wind can be a problem. Wind gusting about 25mph can cause outages for me, but a steady breeze is okay. I live in an area with consistent sea breezes (10-15mph) which do not affect my reception. Two or three storms a year will cause a signal loss due to sway, but signal returns as wind diminishes.
    Tree mounting is a viable option if you consider these points - even though the dish install instructions tell you specifically NOT to mount in a tree.
    -Scott
     

Share This Page