Direct view or RPTV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by EricD, Jan 16, 2003.

  1. EricD

    EricD Auditioning

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    I'm starting to look for a new TV. I started out looking for a HD RPTV but for the money I'm going to spend (~$1400) I am worried I am going to get an inferior set that won't last as long and will require constant tweaking. I then started looking at direct view HD tvs and was wondering if I should get one of those for the same money (32 inch). The whole burn-in issue bothers me with the RP because I don't like to watch stretched images, like football, I know some of these guys are fat but when you stretch it they take up half the screen!!

    Anyway, I'm just looking for some insight from anybody who has had this dilemna and decided either way. BTW, the RPTV was a Panasonic PT47WX49S and the direct view was a Toshiba 32HF72. I will be most likely be watching DVDs and TV equally with some PS2 thown in everyonce in a while.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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    Eric,

    Well, the trade-offs are:

    RPTV: You'll need to deal with convergence, which you have to adjust at the outset and occasionally tweak.

    Direct View: No convergence to adjust.

    RPTV: Bigger screen.

    Direct View: Smaller screen.

    RPTV: You need to be able to control the light in the room somewhat.

    Direct View: Brighter, more placement possibilities.

    RPTV: More prone to burn-in, but if you properly adjust the contrast/white level, you have little to worry about. Still, use caution when viewing any source with static images, tickers, logos, etc. and don't overdo it...like, don't turn the TV to CNN and leave it there all day every day.

    Direct View: Less prone to burn-in, though you can still burn an image onto the screen if you leave it in torch mode and don't pay attention to static images.

    Re: Stretch modes. Some sets have better stretch modes than others. Check them out and see which you prefer. As the years go by, more and more material will be broadcast in widescreen and stretch modes will become less important.

    You have to figure out where your priorities are and where you're willing to make compromises.

    Jan
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    I'm somewhat in the same boat as Eric. But one impression I have, is that if you look at pure video quality, CRTs still win? (Well, except maybe for LCDs, but that's out of my price range.)

    And, I've heard that RPTVs "lose" their brightness over time?
     
  4. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

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    I had the same concerns with RPTV and Direct View. I was looking at the pt47wx42 vs. ct34wx52 (34" 16:9 tube). I ended up ordering the 47" rptv over the 34" tube.

    I wanted a 16:9 format and didn't want to spend the money on a 4:3 HDTV. I choose the 47" because of the size and it looked better from across the room. I didn't like the 34" because of the size. It was too small for my viewing habits.

    I just ordered the set this morning and waiting on delivery. I will probably post newbie questions on what to do when my set arrives, but first I have to wait for delivery.

    Its going to be a long wait .

    I got an excellent deal on the TV. None of the retail stores or the internet could match it.
     
  5. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Tim, congrats! [​IMG]
    There are excellent resources for tweaking the Panny's, including a dedicated site:
    www.panny.tv
    And for anyone considering the older 47wx49, that site is a definite must.
    _Man_
     
  6. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Man,

    I'm not much of a tweaker, but I like to know what should I do first when I get it out of the box, get it hook up and etc.

    I've been reading that the contrast is too bright out of the box, but how far should I lower it to and what else should I be aware about? And how soon can I use Avia?

    Sorry for all these questions. I'm sure that I be asking more when I get the set.
     
  7. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    You could use Avia right away. If not, at least turn down the contrast to 40-50%.
    Probably the only thing you might not want to do right away is fine convergence via the service menu. It's time consuming, and you'll almost certainly need to redo it again before your TV has been broken in. The general rule of thumb for break-in period is ~100 hours of normal use.
    Also, let the TV warm up for at least 30-45min before doing your adjustments beyond just turning down the contrast. Otherwise, the TV's characteristics will drift by the time you're done w/ adjustments. This applies all the time, not just when the TV's still new.
    The current line of Panny's seem to be pretty good out-of-the-box, so you may find that you don't need to do much serious tweaking to get good/satisfying results. Of course, there will be units that look awful out-of-the-box as can happen w/ any brand.
    Anyway, turn down the contrast, let the TV warm up, do the user level convergence, and then do the Avia adjustments. You'll probably find the need to redo convergence and Avia from time to time during the break-in period. Might also want to check geometry via a cross hatch pattern to make sure nothing's seriously wrong although you might want to wait to fix any minor issues--that's up to you.
    Do try to enjoy the TV during the break-in period. [​IMG]
    _Man_
     
  8. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

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    Thanks, I am saving this post as we speak.[​IMG] I guess, I can watch lots of DVD's/TV during those 100 hours .
    I have to wait over a month till my cable company provides me with a HD box. Currently, I have digital cable. I plan to watch everything in stretch mode. Will any of these things matter during the break in? Should or should not?
     
  9. EricD

    EricD Auditioning

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    Thanks for all of the input, right now I am leaning to the RPTV, bigger is better I guess!! Luckily the room that it will be in is in the basement with no windows, perfect for RPTVs. Like Kevin I would like a LCD or plasma but they are still way out of my price range. Hopefully I will be able to get the tv soon, been itching for a wide screen for about three years.

    Thanks again for the input,
    Eric
     
  10. Tommy G

    Tommy G Screenwriter

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    Eric, I wouldn't rule out a FP. Look on this site for people selling. See this link http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=112253
    for an example. I bought an FP from Scott and you could always drop him a line. He always seems to have some used projectors for great prices.
     

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