Direct View HDTV's any good?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Dwight Amato, Sep 24, 2003.

  1. Dwight Amato

    Dwight Amato Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm looking at replacing my 27" Panasonic Superflat TV (10 years old and still working great) with a slightly larger, HDTV set. Since my cable company is carrying HDTV now for free I would love to watch these shows in my basement without going into my basement to watch it on my 47" Panny HDTV.

    My question is, how is the picture quality on these sets? I am looking at getting a standard 4x3 set because I don't want to pay the premium for a 16x9. Not only that, but my wife watches a ton of SD TV and she hates the wide modes on my 16x9. I have never seen an HDTV program displayed on a 4x3 tube, so I am wondering if it is as big of a difference as it is on my RPTV?

    I know my RPTV with 7" guns cannot display the full 1080i resolution, but it sure looks pretty damn sweet. I am curious if direct view sets, especially ones that have to display this signal in a 16x9 window can display as much information.

    BTW, I only sit around 6 feet away in a very small room, so a 36" set would just be too big (WAF).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    It's physically impossible for a direct-view set to resolve as much detail as a well-designed RPTV. But the brighter images with their greater contrast ratio can make up for that. Also, a 4:3-native HD-capable set will display HD in 16:9.
     
  3. Mark Hedges

    Mark Hedges Second Unit

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    I have a Sony 32HS500 32" 4:3 direct-view HDTV set. I like it. HDTV programming (what there is of it) looks great - MUCH better than regular TV or even DVD.

    Mark
     
  4. Chris Tedesco

    Chris Tedesco Second Unit

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    I might have to disagree with the statement regarding CRT doesn't have as much detail as an RPTV. I think it's really the opposite.

    Just wondering Jack, why do you make this statement?
     
  5. Greg Black

    Greg Black Second Unit

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    I just bought a JVC I'Art 36" HDTV today to replace my JVC 32" D-Series set. Judging from the HD they were displaying on the set in the store, it looks absolutey incredible. Better than any of the other direct view HD sets. Just as good, if not better than any projection set because of the brighter picture the tube provides.

    I sit about 6-7 feet away from my TV and I went from a 32" to 36" and I don't think that's too close to be sitting, especially with the line doublers that are in HD sets.
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  7. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    You do realise that you are comparing apples and oranges here?
    The 1080i (720p,480,i,p,etc) refer to Vertical Resolution and any progressive scan TV (digital ready), with wire or slotted shadow mask or RPTV ,with a squeeze mode can display that correctly.

    The grid (shadow mask) limits the Horizontal Resolution. The quality of the processing electronics comes into play here too but CRT developement is usually the limiting facter.

    In the "old days" the only number advertised was the horizontal rezolution since all TVs (USA) were limited to 240 (480i) lines of vertical resolution. Right now both numbers are being publicised, to much public confusion.

    Of course there could be lots of exceptions on the way manufacturers choose to scale some resolutions (especially 720p) but I can't see any major company needing to fudge on 1080i , unless they're still using old CRT technology (triad dot-phosphor mask)(triad can produce a smaller spot but can't squeeze).
     
  8. dan fritzen

    dan fritzen Second Unit

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    So steve what you are saying and I think I have read elsewhere on here, is all HD TV's do 1080i horizontal but the vertical lines are differing, CRT has less horizontal lines than RP?
     
  9. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    Television terminology can be confusing. It's 1080 horizontal LINES that make up the picture. They're stacked vertically so 1080 is the vertical resolution. As each horizontal line sweeps left to right (horizontally) it illuminates phosphors . How many discrete white dots it can produce on the way accross is the horizontal resolution and is mostly limited by the structure of the tube. (very simplified explanation!)

    Since each tube in a RPTV has no mask (it has a solid phosphor coating Red,Blue,or Green) the tube is no longer the limit to horizontal resolution (or vertical for that matter).

    A complete discussion of TV design would take a lots of pictures and pages of explanation (and still might not make any sense to a lot of people) ; but the main point concerning RPTV vs Direct View CRT is that the RPTV tube has no internal mask to limit resolution.
     
  10. Jonathan Dagmar

    Jonathan Dagmar Supporting Actor

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