Dipole Placement

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Alex_Santos, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    Im interested in getting dipoles for rears in my system. My question is if there are shelves or objects blocking the direct path of the speaker, will it affect the sound dramatically? Definately need some advice on this one. Thanks
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Dipoles depend/require a lot of smooth, un-broken wall space to reflect the sound off of. This is one of the reasons I am not a big fan of dipolar speakers.

    Monopole speakers are your safest bet. And dont forget to buy 3 - that rear-center speaker.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    Thanks for the info. Anyone else?
     
  4. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    see the reason that I was thinking dipoles is that the speaker placement will be behind and above the listener. I thought that the dipoles would be better because I would not be able to get the monopoles to image correctly. Anyone know what I should do.
     
  5. Daniel Martin

    Daniel Martin Auditioning

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    Alex,
    Since direct radiating speakers were out of the question in our family room (WAF), I had to opt for dipole speakers.
    We have an odd shaped room, open wall on one side, closed L shape wall on the other. Although the wall is blocking one surround about 3' behind it, I did not notice any sound issues.
    I tried the recommended side placement ~3' above ear level but this was dangerous for people walking around on one side. We ended up locating them near a 10' ceiling. This degraded the soundfield a bit, but was better than having injured guests [​IMG]
    Overall, although not ideal, we have been pleased with this setup for HT.
    Daniel.
     
  6. itai

    itai Stunt Coordinator

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    alex

    i bought dipoles for sur., and currently they are placed sides-and behind the listener, just like direct monopoles, because i dont have the side walls they require. (a window and a hall insted...).

    they sound amazing!! acting like or better than direct firing speakers. they give me acurate positioning and diffuse ambient sound. i plan to add another two on the sides too. not as planned, but still, graet job.

    (meanwhile of course, i'm looking for a BIG living room apartment to move to. this time, i know my priorities, i look for walls apropriate for a 7.1 set...)
     
  7. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    thanks for the opinions guys but I don't quite think that you are understanding my question. Id like to get the dipoles for rears but my walls have shelves and other things blocking the path of the sound that would come out of the dipoles. Im wondering if the interruption of the soundwave would screw up the soundfield too much.
     
  8. Daniel Martin

    Daniel Martin Auditioning

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    Alex,
    My understanding of how dipoles works is that they create the surround sound field by "diffusing" the sound around you.
    If you have too many shelves or obstacles, you may end up breaking the sound field or making sound more directional.
    I would explore three options:
    a) try placing the dipoles where you want temporarly and listen
    b) mount/suspend the dipoles in front of the obstacles
    c) use monopoles
    You may want to look on www.dolby.com for alternate positions for dipoles. You may find a placement the would minimize obstacles in front of your dipoles.
    Hope this help,
    Daniel.
     
  9. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    thanks dan but unfortunately i dont think that it does. I think that I will have to go with monopoles because my current listening position is at an angle and the walls the dipoles would be on have shelves and my desk on them. Plus the sound would come at an odd angle to the listener. Maybe I could get some mounting brackets to fix this. Any ideas?
     
  10. Howard_S

    Howard_S Supporting Actor

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    My Studio ADPs recommend 45cm min free space between each side of the speaker so I figure if you have that you'll be fine.
     
  11. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    Thanks How but im not worried about mounting space. Im worried about the sound defelecting off of my shelves and desk. Anyone else?
     
  12. itai

    itai Stunt Coordinator

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    monopoles.

    dipoles need free space to work with. mono's will ignore you're obstacles, go strait to your ears.
     
  13. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    This is really funny. A month ago on this forum when I offered the opinion that dipoles were more sensitive to positioning than monopoles, I got trounced by people saying that since dipoles are designed to reflect sound off many surfaces, placement is far less of an issue than with monopoles. According to this conventional wisdom, your shelves and obstacles will actually cause a much greater problem for monopoles. As I understand it, the only thing you do *not* want to do with dipoles is to place them on stands away from walls and other surfaces. Otherwise, they are fine with shelves and other obstacles in the way. They just need surfaces to bounce off of. Which view is correct I do not know, but I can see now that there are two distinct schools of thought on the subject.
     
  14. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    thanks Eric. Anyone else?
     
  15. Alex_Santos

    Alex_Santos Second Unit

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    bump
     
  16. Andrew B

    Andrew B Agent

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    I might as well spout in with my 2 cents after going from monopole to some dipoles. Anyway I recently upgraded from a pair of direct firing Mini Monitors to a set of ADP-370 Dipoles to compleate my 7.1 system of my Denon 3802. My finding with the old Mini's as side surrounds were quite senestive to stuff in their way, an example would be the couch. When one end was reclined it gave an extra 2 DB on the sound meter for that sides speaker, plus it soundes a bit different [​IMG] But I have no problems with the diffused sound of the ADP's with the couch, even the fact that one of the ADP's back end is firing into 2 open doors and part of a corner does not seem to affect the sound much at all compaired to the other surround whose rear end is going into a full corner (plus a DVD rack). I also have not had any problems that I can tell with other things such as chairs, hanging wall quilts, patio door blinds. Overall the placement of the ADP's was much easier for me than the Mini's and provides a better sound for movies (its much more enveloping). I hope this helps you out.
    Andrew
     
  17. Quentin

    Quentin Cinematographer

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    The thing with dipoles is this: they create what is called a "null sound field" if positioned correctly. That is, they surround an area (determined by placement) with sound. No direct sound reaches this "null area". Instead, the sound surrounds it. Thus, "surround sound".
    So, when placing dipoles it is MOST important that your listening area lies between the area that the dipoles are surrounding with sound. If you are using walls or something else to aid the dipoles with reflection, that is fine. As long as the reflected sound is not bouncing into/through your "null area". Regardless, you will always want the dipoles facing each other (or close to that position) so that their sound will surround the spot in between them.
    Personally, I have my Polk f/x 300's placed near corners for more reflection...ultimately widening my potential "null area". I love it, and wouldn't change it for the world. [​IMG]
     

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