Differences in RG-6 cable?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Tim Holyoke, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. Tim Holyoke

    Tim Holyoke Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2002
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    I usually get my coax from Radioshack since it's the only place that really carries it in my small town. I live in the country, and have satellite, so always got the RG-6 that was labeled "satellite coax." There is also "TV coax." Is there really a difference? I only ask because I have 50' of "TV coax" sitting around and I need 50' for a new satellite run. Thanks a lot for any help.

    Tim
     
  2. Ryan Leemhuis

    Ryan Leemhuis Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2002
    Messages:
    490
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, TV coax is probably RG5 which can't support the bandwidth of a digital signal.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,100
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    There is a difference, Tim. You’ve probably noticed that the “satellite coax” (better know as RG-6) is thicker overall. It has a thicker center conductor, and the dielectric (the white insulator around the center conductor) is a larger diameter than the “TV coax” (better known as RG-59). Those differences are critical to delivering the best signal for satellite. Using RG-59 can degrade picture quality, like giving vertical bars or lines in the picture on some channels.

    Broadcast signals work fine with RG-59 or RG-6.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Tim Holyoke

    Tim Holyoke Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2002
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the replies guys. I should have mentioned in my original question that both were RG-6. After actually looking at the cables, not just the box itself, I found both the "TV coax" and "Satellite coax" had all the exact same numbers (RG-6, 75 ohm, 18 AWG). The only difference was that the satellite one said "satellite" on the cable. So if the numbers are all the same, are they the same? Maybe they just call one "satellite" so they can charge a few bucks more? Thanks again.

    Tim
     
  5. MikeRo

    MikeRo Auditioning

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, if they are both marked as RG6, I would say that either one would work. You can't hurt anything by trying the cable you already have anyway. They probably did mark one as satellite so that they can make a few bucks extra.
     
  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'd look at the center conductor to see if it's 100% copper or copper over steel. When one is dealing only with frequencies above say 50 MHz, you can use the latter as the signal is largely located on the 'skin' of the conductor and the steel carries nothing. Hence there's no reason to use all copper which is more expensive.
     
  7. Kenneth Harden

    Kenneth Harden Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Messages:
    1,365
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, at Best Buy, a 6' chenk of RG-6 is $6.99, so it is probably worth it to splurge.

    I would like to try a piece of RG-59 and see if there really is a difference.
     
  8. Chris Lanni

    Chris Lanni Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2002
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Christopher
    Hi guys...

    RG6 is what all of your cable companies run for your cable tv. It is also what is used for satellite television. Usually you will find that there is a seperate ground wire running along the outside of the "satellite" RG6. RG6 has an 18 gauge center conductor, whereas, RG59 has a 22 gauge center conductor. You really do not want anything to do with RG59 as it is obsolete. If you have two cables and they both are stamped RG6 along the side of the wire then they are the same, unless one says quad shield. Then it just has an extra pair of shields.

    Gods Love
    chris
     
  9. Chris Lanni

    Chris Lanni Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2002
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Christopher
    Hi guys...

    RG6 is what all of your cable companies run for your cable tv. It is also what is used for satellite television. Usually you will find that there is a seperate ground wire running along the outside of the "satellite" RG6. RG6 has an 18 gauge center conductor, whereas, RG59 has a 22 gauge center conductor. You really do not want anything to do with RG59 as it is obsolete. If you have two cables and they both are stamped RG6 along the side of the wire then they are the same, unless one says quad shield. Then it just has an extra pair of shields.

    Gods Love
    chris
     
  10. Chris Lanni

    Chris Lanni Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2002
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Christopher
    Hey Leo...

    Out of curiosity, what are you using the RG59 for? What do you usually pay for the cable whether by foot or spool? I do not sell cable and am in no way affiliated with anybody, just curious.

    Gods Love
    chris

    P.S. I should have said obsolete for Home Theater use. I must not be getting enough sleep.
     
  11. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
    What possible difference would there be in interconnects or a component video run of several meters or for that matter, 50 feet?
     
  12. Chris Lanni

    Chris Lanni Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2002
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Christopher
    Chu...

    I am only going off the original topic. Which is satellite tv. RG59 is wholeheartily not recommended for Satellite. Everything that I have read lists RG6 as the recommended cable. Now some say that you can use RG59 from the tv to the receiver, but not to the dish. I say why would you buy two different size cables when RG6 is a better quality and is similiarly priced? Now keep in mind that I live in Ohio and can only speak from my "area" of expertese.[​IMG]

    For what you are talkin' Chu, you are right. RG59 would probably be fine for component and interconnects. Again it goes back to cost. Why pay the same price just to get RG59?
     
  13. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
    Because it's more flexible, puts less strain on connections, the bandwidth of the signal from your player even if running 1080i is a piece of cake, and the attenuation drop compared to RG6 over a few meters will tax sophisticated measuring devices...stuff like that.
     
  14. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    789
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am trying to use a 25 foor RG6 cable with F to RCA converters from HD for a composite video signal, and it doesn't work. There is a crawling band artifact that is not present with what should be a far lessor cable. Frustrating.
     
  15. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 10, 1999
    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, we get the RG-59 by the 500 or 1000 foot spool, and the runs are anywhere from about 30' (DVD player through the racks the to distribution amps) to about 1500' (distro amp, through the conduit and cable troughs out to a display somewhere else.)

    We use a variety of Beldin and West Penn wire, depending on who supplies it - the stuff we buy is the Beldin, usually 8241.

    On the RG-6 side, I know a lot of people who won't use anything but Beldin 1695A, for any purpose. I suppose its a nice enough cable, but it's difficult to get in long rolls, and all of our infrastructure (crimpers, dies, strippers, and ends) are already in place for '59.

    8241 is conveniently available for $0.13/ft (in 1000' spools) from Markertek... we might be able to get it for $0.11/ft or so.

    Leo Kerr
     
  16. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2003
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use nothing but rg-6 (I like only needing one type can't grab the wrong one from the truck) direct tv and dishnetwork will charge a dealer back all commisions if rg-59 is used, (good incentive not to screw up)
     

Share This Page