Did DVD lead to more bass??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon D, Apr 25, 2002.

  1. Jon D

    Jon D Stunt Coordinator

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    I couldn't help but notice that with a few exceptions, all of the DVD's that are currently 'bass champions' and feature intense sub 20 Hz bass, such as The Haunting and Titan A.E., are of films released after the Phantom Menace in 1999. By this point, HT and DVD's were starting to pick up. Knowing this, did Hollywood sound designers start placing this ultra deep sub bass in their soundtracks because they finally had a market where people could experience it? very few, if any, commericial theaters can reproduce good bass under 40 Hz, whereas most HT can reproduce down to 30, or in many instances much, much lower. So did DVD and HT technology lead to the now prevalent 'subharminic bass', or is it just a coincidence of one movie (TPM) doing it for the hell of it, and everybody else following the lead? Opinions?
     
  2. David Ruiz

    David Ruiz Second Unit

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    I don't know, but that sure sounds like it. I just bought 3 movies the other day:

    Spy Games

    Behind Enemy Lines

    Training Day

    And all of them had pretty deep bass. Training Day didn't have as much as the others, but I see that most movies now-a-days have persistant bass. I like this trend.
     
  3. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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    I think it may also be an effect of giving people what they expect.
    For some time, the general conception seemed to be that laserdisc had more bass than DVD, and many people claimed that this might be due to inferiority of the DVD format. After a while we pretty much settled for the explanation that movie soundtracks were remixed, many DVD's were remixed to suit smaller rooms, and laserdiscs might in many cases not be remixed at all from the mix used in theaters, meaning the bass in laserdisc was stronger because it was actually suited for larger rooms, and then we had the whole discussion about which is correct, intended and so on.
    I think it simply caught on for DVD producers that people like bass in their soundtracks, so after a while, the trend became to use more bass, partly because as you say, more people have the equipment to enjoy it, but also, I think, because now more people also had a format to enjoy it on. In other words, I think it is not so much because of DVD, but because of DVD consumers, so to speak [​IMG]
     
  4. Jon D

    Jon D Stunt Coordinator

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    Bjorn. I'm sure that deep bass is a result of the HT crowd's interests, but what I'm curious about is if that led to the inclusion of it in the first place. Like I said, from my understanding (and experience), few if any theaters can reproduce bass below 30 Hz, and I highly doubt any of them can reproduce the under 20 Hz information contained in many current soundtracks. If there are theaters that can reproduce
     

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