Denon AVR-1705 not performing well...

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Stephen Gladwin, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. Stephen Gladwin

    Stephen Gladwin Stunt Coordinator

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    OK...I just hooked up my new Denon 6.1 1705 receiver and...it doesn't play nearly as loud as my crappy Sony 5.1 htib receiver! What gives?

    Some specs: My old sony receiver was 100w/ch, and the Denon is 75w/ch. I was told by the guy at Tweeter that, give or take a few watts, the sound output wouldn't be much greater or weaker. SO, I decided to get the Denon b/c of the better build quality and wealth of features. BUT, now when I crank the Denon to a pleasing volume (about -18), I definitely get some distortion/hiss from my center speaker and I know that can fry speakers. No matter how much I cranked my sony, it never gave any kind of distortion.

    It seems that the Denon's sound is really tinny, especially in the center speaker. The volume is also all over the place--whisper quiet for dialogue, then booming loud for effects. And yes, my speakers are calibrated with Avia.

    **So what's the deal? Is there some setting on the Denon that can make it play louder and with less distortion? Or should I send it back and get a more powerful receiver, like one with at least 100w/ch? I see a 6.1 Yamaha receiver with 125w/ch that I can get at a good price, would that be more powerful and play at a louder volume?

    Here are some further specs about my setup: JBL E80 for front L/R (91db sensitivy rating), EC35 center (91db sensitivity), SVS PB10 subwoofer. My room is 9X19X13.
     
  2. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    That's not going to make that much of a difference. The old Sony you had was different in regards to how the volume worked. The Denon should be able to easily go to "0" in your situation. You'll probably find that the volume increases the most from -20 to 0. Plus, it should top out at +15 or so, but don't push it that hard.

    Here's my guess. The crossover on your Sony was fixed at 100 or 120Hz, so the sub took over for more bass duties. Now, you have the Denon set to 80Hz and a bit more is depending on your JBLs. Ideally, it is best to keep your crossover set to 80Hz. However, you could set it to 120Hz and see if your volume on the Denon seems more like the Sony. Also, are your JBL 80s set as large or small on the Denon? With the Sony, how were they set - large or small?

    Something is different between the settings on the two receivers. I suspect when you find that variable, you'll have your answer as to why the Denon doesn't seem as loud.
     
  3. Stephen Gladwin

    Stephen Gladwin Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks so much Wayne! BTW: I previously had my speakers all set to "small" on the DENON, and before on my Sony, it didn't even LET me set the speaker size! I just set the crossover to 150hz and the volume does seem more stable (less hiss/distortion). I also play the receiver at around -17, and that is plenty loud. The receiver goes as loud as +15db. Also, all speakers are still all set to "small."

    *But my main concern is the amp in my receiver clipping and ruining my speakers. I mean, is -17 overtaxing the denon? It was always my understanding (and the general consensus over here) that it's less likely to clip b/c of the superior build quality and circuitry of the Denon. Is this true?

    ***Finally, I've also noticed that the Denon is WAY more capable of reproducing ranges of sound (yay!). I hear things in films I've never heard before. Now, could I just be hearing limitations of the soundtrack, like hiss and distortion (especially on the higher end of the soundtrack)? That is to say, it's the soundtrack that's making the hiss/harsh sound, not my overtaxed receiver?
     
  4. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    When you are running at -17, you are not pushing things too far. Heck, I was out and about today and listened to a Denon AVR-3805 that was running at -5 on the dial pushing a pair of Sonus Faber speakers. Not a hint of distortion or peaking out. Granted, the room was a bit large and the Sonus Faber speakers have a bit more tolerance on the upper end.

    I'd be willing to bet that your Sony receiver would have killed off the JBL speakers before the Denon will.

    I still think there are quite a few variables that are different. As you indicated, the Sony was crossed-over at 150 Hz. Ouch! The bass must have been more apparent on where it was coming from - as opposed to setting it to 80 Hz like on your Denon.

    Lots of us have gone through a change pattern. Some of us have owned old school receivers that had lots of low end - mated with speakers that had 12" or 15" woofers. Now, fast forward to nowadays - we're mainly running satellite speakers with sub-woofers. We're all adjusting to how the volume levels work. Heck, the old Pioneer or Sansui receivers would crank. It's hard to find gear that will perform like the old stuff would. That is, unless, you have a big budget for gear. I can spot plenty of weaknesses in my gear. Some I sell off. Some, I live with.

    Not to get too far off topic, but the other day, I heard the following gear:

    - Bryston pre-amp
    - Bryston power amp
    - DynAudio monitors
    - Meridian CD player

    The room was smallish - 12 x 10 (feet) or so. I was sitting about 7 ft away from the speakers, which were placed about 7 ft apart. To date, that has got to be about the best sounding gear I've heard. Things were getting comfortable at about the 50% mark on the volume level. Now, if money were no object, I'm sure I could have taken that gear home for $8,000 or so. The pair of DynAudio speakers were $3,000 alone.

    Great sound costs money. Good sound is achievable. Most of us just live with good sound and are happy.
     
  5. Stephen Gladwin

    Stephen Gladwin Stunt Coordinator

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    You are a very reassuring man, Mr. Ernst! Yeah, -17 is about the loudest I need to set it anyway, so most listening is actually around -20 or so. Anyways, just for kicks I set my crossover at 150hz, and I really didn't notice any directional problems whatsoever! It sounded nice and omnidirectional. But I think i'll dial it down to 100hz anyway... Thanks again Wayne[​IMG]
     
  6. Stephen Gladwin

    Stephen Gladwin Stunt Coordinator

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    Heh, the idea is to not kill off the speakers AT ALL, Wayne[​IMG] Are you implying that the Denon could ruin these speakers, albeit at a slower rate? I mean, do speakers just crap out like that? I certainly can't afford to replace these speakers anytime soon.....
     
  7. Tom D

    Tom D Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello, Stephen a solly question, but did you recheck your speaker connections and made sure that all your speakers are in phase - plus to plus (red) and negative to negative {black}, and is your phase set properly on your sub.

    Regards, Tom
     
  8. Stephen Gladwin

    Stephen Gladwin Stunt Coordinator

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    yes i did check tom. I checked via a calibration DVD (avia), and just manually checked. thanks though...
     

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