Denon 3802 - where does the rolloff of high frequencies start?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tom_Mack, Apr 15, 2002.

  1. Tom_Mack

    Tom_Mack Stunt Coordinator

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    I have heard people say that the Denon 3802 has a roll-off in the upper frequencies. Can someone help describe where that roll-off starts? Is it just the extreme upper frequencies? Or does it affect the sound of higher pitched instruments? Violins? Trumpets? Piano? Cymbals? Vocals?

    I bought the Denon 3802 a couple of months ago and it is in the shop right now due to speaker hiss and a dullness starting in the upper mid-range going up. I'm sure that a roll-off starting in the dialog range is wrong, but when it comes back I want to make sure that the sound is correct.

    I bought the Denon 3802 to replace a Yamaha v596 that was occasionally way to bright, but I'll take the brightness over dull voices any day!
     
  2. John Sully

    John Sully Stunt Coordinator

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    The specs on the 3802 say it's bandwidth is 10Hz - 100kHz +0 -3. I don't see much of an HF rolloff here.
     
  3. Tom_Mack

    Tom_Mack Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree that the specs look flat, but so do Yamahas receivers and there is definitely an audible difference between the Yamaha sound and Denon sound. The Yamaha definitely puts more out on the high end.

    Do most people feel that the Denon 3802 is more of a neutral sounding receiver than a warm rolled off receiver? By just the frequency specs, all good receivers should sound the same, but my ears tell me that isn't true!

    When my 3802 comes back should I make sure that there is no roll-off or dullness throughout the full frequency range? Does anyone have any good DVD as a test for a natural upper end with both ambient sounds and music?
     
  4. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    If it sounds good to you, does anything else really matter? Warm/neutral/bright are all pretty relative terms, IMO. What is neutral to me could be warm or bright to someone else, depending on their tastes.
     
  5. Tom_Mack

    Tom_Mack Stunt Coordinator

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  6. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    I see, that makes more sense. I doubt it is so mellow as to make everything sound unnaturally rolled off. However, I haven't heard any Denon receivers, so you're better off getting the opinion of someone who has. If you have an SPL meter and the right test tones, I guess you could check your receiver's frequency response into the upper treble. However, the overall response would be affected by your speaker's response, and AFAIK it's not a good idea to feed pure sinewave tones into a tweeter for too long. If you have a test CD with warble tones or band-limited pink noise, that might be a better idea.
     

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