1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Denon 3802 and sep. amp for towers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Armando H, Sep 3, 2001.

  1. Armando H

    Armando H Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2001
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello everyone. This is my first post, though I've been reading on here for months. Anyway, I'm using a Denon 3802 receiver with a Denon poa 5200 amp for my front towers. The 3802 is rated at 110 watts x 7 channels, and the 5200 amp is rated at 120 watts x 2. Do I need to calibrate my system to take in account for the extra wattage of the 5200? I have video essentials, but I never went so far as buying the meter from radio shack. Any help would be appreciated. Another question...the 3802 has 3 crossover settings...80, 100, 120....Should I leave it at 80? (80 is the default setting). I read somewhere that THX uses 80, not sure though. What exactly does the crossover setting do? Thanks guys.
     
  2. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 29, 1999
    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Armando: Yes, to get the best sound from your system you should calibrate it. You can use the test tone on the 3802 or your copy of VE. The analog Radio Shack meter is around $40 or so. IMO, well worth the price.
    The crossover in your receiver is there for one main purpose. To send the bass in your system to where it can best be reproduced. IOW, if you have speakers in your setup that can only play down to 80 Hz or so, then the bass that would normally go to them would play better from the subwoofer (or another speaker that can play lower than 80 Hz if you don't have a sub.)
    Setting a speaker to "large" sends all of the bass to that speaker and any bass sent to that speaker is NOT sent to the sub (or any other speaker.)
    Speakers set to "small" have bass below the chosen frequency (the 80, 100, 120 Hz you mention) filtered out of the speaker feed and sent to the sub (or if you have no sub, to the main speakers, if they're "large".) For speakers, this type of crossover is called a highpass crossover. (Passes high frequencies, filters out low ones.)
    The 80, 100, 120 Hz filters also affect the subwoofer too. But in this case, the frequencies higher than the frequency you chose. Since a sub can't play higher frequencies anyway, filtering them out helps it to play bass with less effort. The crossover used for subs is called a lowpass crossover. (Passes low frequencies, filters out high tones.)
    The frequency you choose for your Denon will be the same for any speaker set as "small". So choose the 80, 100, or 120 Hz based on what works best for your speakers. (BTW, these crossovers are not sudden or abrupt in their action. The filtering is gradual, beginning at the specified frequency.)
    Oh, almost forgot... Welcome to HTF!!
    ------------------
    [Edited last by Chuck Kent on September 03, 2001 at 08:05 PM]
     
  3. Ron Reda

    Ron Reda Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,276
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Does anyone have any suggestions as far as mating the 3802 with an amp?
    I'm looking at doing something similar to Armando and need some pointers. The guy at HiFi Buys suggested going with a B&K, which I'm sure is good, but you've got to take what a salesman says with a grain of salt. He also mentioned that B&K has more of a mellow sound that should compliment the Denon "warm" sound. Specifically, I've had my eye on the B&K Reference 7270 (7 channels x 200 watts).
    Help!
    Thanks,
    Ron
     
  4. Armando H

    Armando H Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2001
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the detailed answer Chuck, it was very helpful.
     
  5. Myram

    Myram Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2001
    Messages:
    292
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ron......
    The Denon POA-5200 is made to go with their A/V receivers. It has a remote turn on lead that connects to the receiver so all you have is one power button. I am using a POA-5200 with my AVR-4800 and it is just great.
    Do a search on Yahoo shopping for the amp.....it will give you a bunch of etailers that stock it. You'll spend around $500 for it and it is well worth it.
    Good Luck
    ------------------
    Home Theater System:
    Klipsch Quartets - fronts
    Klipsch Academy - center
    Klipsch KG 1.5's rear surrounds
    Klipsch KG .5's - rear side surrounds
    Klipsch KSW12 subwoofer
    Denon AVR-4800
    Denon POA-5200 THX Amp(fronts)
    Sony C-67ES CD Player
    JVC 36D201 36" TV
    JVC HR-S3600 SVHS Player
    JVC XV-M565BK DVD Player
    Scientific Atlanta Explorer 2100 Digital Cable box
    Playstation 2
    Monster Power HTS-2000
    Monster M-series Speaker Cable and Subwoofer Cable
    Monster S-Video, Optical, and Component Cables
    RS HT Gold Interconnects
    [Edited last by StevenH on September 04, 2001 at 03:16 PM]
     
  6. Ron Reda

    Ron Reda Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,276
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Steven,
    Thanks for the help!
    I've got a few more questions...
    How is it rated? I'm looking for at least 200W x 5 or 7. How are Denon amps compared to B&K or Parasound amps?
     

Share This Page