Denon 1802 Volume Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ten_Smith, Mar 3, 2002.

  1. Ten_Smith

    Ten_Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    Why does the volume on my 1802 go from -64 to 18?

    In the good old days volume was meassured on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the loudest. If you wanted something really loud maybe you had special equiptment that went to 11.

    What are the new numbers meant to represent? (Don't just say db, I read that in the manual.)

    I'm especially interested in what the 0 on this scale is meant to represent. Its pretty damn loud.

    Any form of explanation would be appreciated.
     
  2. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    The idea is that you can calibrate your system so that it's at reference level when the volume is at "00". That way, when you turn down to "-15", you know that you're listening at 15 dB under reference.

    There really isn't a reference level per se in CD audio, but for Dolby Digital, reference level is:

    up to 105 dB peaks in any one channel

    up to 115 dB peaks in the LFE channel

    Hope that helped.
     
  3. Ten_Smith

    Ten_Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    Thank u richard that does clarify it. With CDs, it gets way too loud in the negative teens, I don't even make it to '00.' If I listen to a dvd at 00 level will it be as loud as the cd?
     
  4. DevinL

    DevinL Extra

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    Yes, when you listen to movies, 105db is plenty loud. It would probably even be louder than your local movie theater. Definitely not recommended if you value your hearing. Personally, I have the 1802 and listen between -15 and -30 on the volume control.
     

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