Definitive Break-in List RPTV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg_Ritchie, Sep 9, 2002.

  1. Greg_Ritchie

    Greg_Ritchie Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,
    I've searched the forum here and I haven't been able to come find a complete list of how to break in a new RPTV. My Toshiba 50HDX82 arrives on Friday and I'd like to make sure I do this right? So far I have:

    1. Let the set warm up for 1/2 hour and do the convergence
    2. Set Contrast and Brightness lower (around 30)
    3. Turn the sharpness down
    4. Turn off SVM,flesh tone etc.
    5. Calibrate using Avia/VE until ISF can be done
    6. Only watch full screen images for first 100 hours

    If I've missed anything any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
  2. SteveMo

    SteveMo Stunt Coordinator

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    Skip the convergance until after the first 100 hours.
    It will change alot in that time.

    If you let it warm up for long periods of time, shut it off at least every four hours for about 15 minutes at a time.

    Avoid static images like logos or stock tickers, and turn your contrast down even more.

    Sharpness is not important

    Don not use the Avia disk until after 100 hours (very important)

    Turn off the features you mentioned but don't do anything that should be done by a technition or in a service menu.

    Allow 150 hours of break in before watching widescreen movies that have the bars, or anything with a static image. ( I know this is tough, mine took 5 days of this)

    I would just leave the contrast down afterwards. The darker your image the better it looks. (my opinion)
     
  3. SteveMo

    SteveMo Stunt Coordinator

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    But do any of these at your own descretion of course
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Out of the box turn contrast to less than 50%, preferably down around 30%. Brightness usually runs around 50% give or take and isn't as important as contrast as far as preventing burn in.

    Contrast=White Level=how bright whites are. The higher you set this the brighter whites will be. Excessively bright whites is what causes burn-in on images left on the screen too long.

    Brightness=Black level=how dark blacks appear. The LOWER you set this the blacker dark areas of the picture will be. Turning this down too far will make dark areas merge into total blackness.
    Once you've set Contrast, turn brightness down until you just start to lose detail in very dark parts of the picture.

    There is no reason to wait 100 hours before doing AVIA, quite the opposite.
    Do wait until the set's been on for an hour or so. Go ahead and do AVIA calibration.

    The set will "settle in" over the first 100 hours so you may want to repeat the AVIA calibration every few days as necessary, but starting out with AVIA settings will go a long way toward reducing the chance of burn-in from new.

    As long as you have turned Contrast down from factory torch mode there is no reason not to watch 2:35 movies right away, just make sure that you also watch lots of stuff that fills the screen.

    I've done the above on 3 rptvs so far and have suffered no burn-in.
     
  5. Michael St. Clair

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    If contrast is high enough to burn in 2.35:1 in the first hundred hours, it will burn in during any hundred hours, it just might be a little less noticable.
    No reason to not turn off the torch mode and watch what you want right away.
     
  6. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

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    >>> Don not use the Avia disk until after 100 hours (very important) >>> Allow 150 hours of break in before watching widescreen movies that have the bars, or anything with a static image. ( I know this is tough, mine took 5 days of this)
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    The guidelines are for all time, not just break in.
    I would hold off on bringing in a paid ISF tech until after 150 or 200 hours of viewing, otherwise all of the other steps can be done at any time.
    The TV should be on for about half an hour before the ISF tech does his work (or before you do convergence).
    With the contrast under a third you should not have difficulty watching movies that don't fill the screen, in any quantity. For games, turn the contrast down under a quarter.
    You will want to use AVIA or Video Essentials (and do convergence if you can) at least once a year to touch things up.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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