Dedicated HT

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Thomas_A, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. Thomas_A

    Thomas_A Second Unit

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    Ok...here we go.

    We are adding on to the house...going up- My new HT will be on second floor...this will be a dedicated room.

    What I could use are some links/posts/keywords to search on accoustical anything...ie flooring/walls...mainly the floor.

    all and any help would be appreciated. I would just do some searches...but dont know names of what to search for.
    thanx
    Thomas.
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    What are you trying to do?

    There are two separate concerns, one is room-treatmend for acoustics within the space for performance.

    The second is room isolation to keep the room quiet from outside noise, and also contain the sounds from being loud in the rest of the house. This second thing is much more difficult to do, requires decoupled walls, mass, etc, specialized ducting, etc. Expensive and complicated.
     
  3. Thomas_A

    Thomas_A Second Unit

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    Thanx for the reply...

    basically what I'm trying to do is have a Dedicated HT upstairs. I'd like to be able to watch a movie without pissing off downstairs more then anything. Ive been on some HT sites and starting to get ideas.

    Sound accoustics and isolation I guess. Since being built from scratch...Should be easier then a re-do! I have a good contractor but want to be better informed.

    again..thanx for the reply
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    A contractor will not know how to design a proper room acoustically, nor will nearly any normal contractor really know how to isolate a room properly. I suggest you read F. Alton Everest's master handbook of acoustics, and spend a lot of time exploring acoustics and studio design forums. Otherwise, you should bring in a pro designer who knows what he's doing on both of these fronts. IT can be accomplished DIY without spending a fortune, but some expert help and general guidance is well worth the extra $$ if you aren't willing to become a quasi-professional by spending a lot of time reading.
     

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