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Dedicated Circuits for HT Equipment?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David_Schiller, Nov 7, 2001.

  1. David_Schiller

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    I've read some posts that recommended having your HT equipment on a dedicated circuit(s). My house (built 1979, if that means anything) has both light switches and receptacles on the two 15A circuits I use for my TV/sub (one wall) and other audio equipment (different wall, different circuit). Should I have an electrician re-wire part of my house to have dedicated circuits for my HT? Is this a really expensive thing to have done? It seems like running wire from my service box to the two outlets I'm using would be very difficult (and $$).
     
  2. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Real Name:
    Ron
    It is very easy and very inexpensive if you do it yourself.
    I installed a dedicated 20amp line from my breaker box into my HT room in about 2 hours. Run the wire from the box to the location of where you want your outlet, wire it up to the breaker and snap it onto you main panel, flip the switch and your all set.
    Go to the local book store and pick up a book on electrical wiring, it is really easy to do.
    It is worth the investmemt either way, you can just save a fair amount of cash doing it yourself.
    Peace Out~ [​IMG]
    ------------------
    http://home.earthlink.net/~peregrinefalcon
     
  3. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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  4. Brian OK

    Brian OK Supporting Actor

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    Dustin,
    You will need to run a sub panel out from your main panel.
    This will be a dedicated sub panel for your HT. I too maxed out my main and had to have an electrician set up my sub panel.
    This work will need to be done by a licensed electrician (in my locale it is a code requirement). I suspect up in your area as well. This was a bonus for me, as I then could run 2 circuits, one for digital gear, one for analog.
    BOK
     
  5. David_Schiller

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    This might be a stupid question, but how to I run the wire from behind the various walls in my house? I have an attic I can crawl around in, but will this usually give me full access? I would think the various studs and limited vision behind dry wall will be a major obstacle. There must be some kind of "snaking" tool...I have Home Depot's "Wiring 1-2-3" book---perhaps that holds some clues.
    If I do this, do I just use standard copper wire and a 20A (not 15A, right?) fuse? Should I twist together the existing wires behind my outlets so I don't break the existing circuit?
    What are the advantages of having the HT on its own circuit? Lower noise (perhaps I can avoid a line conditioner)? Less chance of blowing a fuse?
    Sorry for all the questions...
     
  6. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Here is a link to installing a circuit breaker. I plan on doing this myself when I have the time and get up the nerve not to electrocute myself.
    Kevin
    http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/e...er/install.htm
    [Edited last by Kevin. W on November 08, 2001 at 07:53 AM]
     
  7. Art Miller

    Art Miller Stunt Coordinator

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    Big disclaimer first as I'm no electrician.
    What I did.
    I bought a special dual 20amp breaker from home depot that is 2 20 amp breakers in the space of a single breaker. It is also special in that it uses a common ground, so both 20 amp circuits see the same ground and don't have extra noise induced due to the possibility of the possible differences in ground assoiated with separate circuits. I won't go into specifics of the wiring other than to say that I used 12/3 romex. And yes, this wiring will give you 2 separate circuits capable of 20 amp loads EACH. --This debate came up in another newsgroup and that is the end result. See your local home depot expert..
     
  8. David_Schiller

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    Thanks very much for the advice!
     

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