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Decks, again....

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Bejoy, May 12, 2005.

  1. Bejoy

    Bejoy Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,

    I did post sometime before asking about composite decks, but then after more research decided to do Redwood over PT.
    Couple questions...
    Screws or nails? If screws, do you predrill?
    Did anybody use redwood to cover up the PT on the sides? Or are there any other option to cover up the sides?

    Any other advises? Anything you felt that you would've done different? Any gothca's?


    Bejoy
     
  2. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Bejoy,
    Screws are preferred because the board won't pull up over time (like nails). However, they are more work. Yes, you will want to predrill and countersink the holes (prevents the heads of the screws from protruding).

    If you really want to get fancy, check out EB-TY deck fasteners. You notch the side of the board and attach it to the joist with the fastener (i.e. no screw holes anywhere on the board surface). I built a deck out of Ipe around my hot tub with these fasteners and it was well worth it (no splinters!). However, it was a lot of work (see if you can get redwood decking pre-grooved on the edges). It may only be worth your time if you are planning on walking around in bare feet.

    Good luck with your project!
     
  3. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    Redwood is such a soft wood that predrilling isn't neccessary. If you want it to look 100% perfect, then predrill. Otherwise, just drilling a bit past flush with the screw will drive it into the soft redwood, countersinking itself.

    The one thing I reccommend is sealing your deck as soon as it is finished, and then sealing at least once every other year to keep the wood healthy.
     
  4. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Is that redwood-specific? What I've read regarding PT is to wait several months to make sure it's dried out, before finishing it.
     
  5. DonnyD

    DonnyD Screenwriter

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    Both Joe and Dave are correct.... PT needs to dry out about 4-6 months before sealing and after that, seal on a regular basis........ If you predrill, you must have a LOT of time on your hands.....LOL
     
  6. Bejoy

    Bejoy Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for all the inputs. OK predrilling maybe out except for the ends [​IMG].

    Joe,

    Since you are familiar with the Colorado weather, what kind of sealant do you recommend? My deck is on the south side of the house, so lots of sun for sure.
     
  7. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    I don't really know around here, I have a brick patio at my house [​IMG] My lumber days were in the Salinas valley in CA, so mostly we coated for foggy/misty weather there.

    I would say really any decent sealant is probably fine. Go to a good paint store and see what they suggest. You can always paint the deck instead of staining, but redwood is so pretty I think it looks best in its natural state.

    One thing to consider is using square head screws instead of phillips head. You need to buy a square head bit for your drill to use them, but back in the day they were greatly preferred. Less slippage, and a ton less stripping of the screw head. Not a make or break deal, but if you are having stripping issues, try a square head instead.
     
  8. Jay Taylor

    Jay Taylor Supporting Actor

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    Last year we built a balcony with a 36' x 10' composite deck, a steel primary frame, and an ACQ treated lumber secondary frame.

    We used the EB-TY deck fasteners that Greg mentioned and we love them. It's great for walking out on the balcony barefoot or in socks. It also looks great having no screws or screw holes visible.
     

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