dealing with car salesmen

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeremy Illingworth, Jul 17, 2002.

  1. Jeremy Illingworth

    Jeremy Illingworth Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2000
    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    0
    My friend wants to buy a new car and since I'm the most car knowledgable person she knows she asked me to come with her. The salesman seemed really nice at first, we explained that it was our first time buying a new car and this was our second trip to a dealer. Eventually she really liked the Tracker and we took a five minuted drive in it. After we got back we started talking about money.

    The cash price on the windshield was different that the GM Financing price, which is the way she'd like to go. You can't beat 0%. So he filled out the form with all her info to see if she would qualify. We said that we'd like to think about it and go to a few more dealers. He became pushy and kept saying that she could take it home today. I said that we'd like to keep looking but would like him to see if we qualify for financing, so we know whether to even bother adding it to the list. Then he said he wasn't going to check, citing the great cost and time involved, unless she agreed to take upon approval. I thought that was a bit odd since the Toyoda dealer ran her through even though she was only mildly interested in a Toyoda. Is this normal? I really didn't like it when he became pushy and said over and over again that she could take it home today. Is there a certain way to deal with car salesmen that works?

    jeremy
     
  2. Josh Lowe

    Josh Lowe Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2002
    Messages:
    1,063
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  3. Brian_J

    Brian_J Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2001
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Never go into a dealer without a pre-approval. Often they can beat your finance deal but at least you are going in with a position of strength knowing what you can qualify for at your bank. They make a lot of money putting people in loans that are higher than you actually could qualify for. Also, never go in without already knowing which vehicles you want and which options and a print out of the exact dealer cost and all rebates and incentives (easily found on the internet). Do this and its a simple straight forward (albeit time consuming) process.

    Brian
     
  4. Michael D. Bunting

    Michael D. Bunting Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 1999
    Messages:
    1,828
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Michael
    Check out www.edmunds.com before you buy also...just to see what others are paying for the exact same vehicle and options.
    When I purchaed my last vehicle..I had pre-approved fianncing from my bank...and then I emailed dealers in my area (visit the dealers websites) the exact amount I was willing to pay for the vehicle I wanted. Most of them replied back saying no way they could give me the vehicle I wanted for the price I gave them. But one dealer did...and that's where I purchased from the next day.
    You can save alot of $$$ by doing a few hours worth of research if you can spare the time.
    Good luck!
     
  5. AviTevet

    AviTevet Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2002
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, just go in, say "I'll give you this amount for the car with these options" and they'll say "Let's talk about it" and you say "I just did." If they say "OK" then buy, if not then walk. Don't feel bad about walking out on them in the middle of a sentence if they don't stop talking. If they knew you weren't going to buy, they'd totally ignore you.
     
  6. Don_Houle

    Don_Houle Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2002
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northwestern New Jersey
    Real Name:
    Don
    Car salesmen are sneaky bastards!

    A few years ago my wife (then my girlfriend) was buying her first new car. I went with her for 'moral support' as she checked out several of the local car dealers and test drove several vehicles that she liked. I stayed quiet and did not get involved at most of the dealerships except when she asked for my opinions.

    We went to one place (I think it was a Toyota dealer) where, before they would even talk to her about prices, they said they needed a credit card and her driver's license (this is AFTER she test drove TWO vehicles!)! I knew I had to step in, so we asked why they needed her credit card.

    "Oh, it's just something we require before we can start talking!"

    I was like Obi-Wan Kenobi. "You don't need her credit card."

    Unfortunately, my skill with the Force is not so hot, and the salesman continued to say he needed them. It came to the point where I had to just say "No, you are NOT getting a credit card from her!" Finally, the salesman says that he'll get his manager. After about 20 minutes, the manager comes over with the same story. We tell him no way and he finally gives the salesman the go-ahead to try to work the deal with no credit card. We got "the best he could do" prices on the two cars and walked out - no deal!

    What's the deal with the credit card? I've NEVER been asked for a credit card when buying a car - and I've done it 3 or 4 times before. The only thing I can think of is that they hold it to keep you in the dealership until you ultimately give in!

    BTW, she ended up buying a KIA. It was easy. The salesman told us the prices of the cars she liked, my wife said that she would be willing to pay $2000 less than the quoted prices and he accepted the deal. She drove out less than 30 minutes later!
     
  7. Mark Paquette

    Mark Paquette Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 1999
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don,
    I ran into that credit card crap when I bought my last boat. This particular dealer at very large boat show insisted on getting a credit card number from me before he could talk price. I pretty much laughed in his face and walked away. Ended up buying the same boat from a different dealer at a cheaper price who didn't want to see my credit card before we talked.
     
  8. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 1998
    Messages:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    0
    The most important thing is to know what you are talking about. You need to go to a dealer with a specific vehicle and options in mind, and know everything you can about it. Take printouts from edmunds and kbb.com. When you know the invoice amount and true market value, you know more than the salesman ever wants you to know. Also, go in with the mindset that you don't need the car, and no matter what you aren't buying that day.

    If you are in a browse mode, where you are still trying to narrow down the cars you are interested in, tell the salesman up front that you won't be buying for a month or so. A good salesman will realize that a sale in a month is still better than no sale today. Also, if you haven't picked a particular vehicle, the final price and financing shouldn't be as important. So there won't be reason to get into much detail at that point.

    I've often been pushed to sign some document stating that I agree to buy the car that day if we agree on a price. I don't mind signing that because once they show it to me, the max price I'm willing to pay drops by $10,000. Its a worthless piece of paper so it doesn't matter.

    In your particular case trying to verify credit before deciding on the car, I'd recommend lieing. Make him think there's a good chance you'll take it if the financing and price is right, then change your mind. Just don't sign anything if you agreed on a price already.

    Finally, in my experience when dealing with lower end dealers (cars in the low 20's and under), you may have to do a walk out. That's where you finally get fed up with the negotiations and walk out. Then magically the salesman will be able to drop the price. If he's got your phone number, go home, in a day or two the price will drop even more.
     
  9. Tim Markley

    Tim Markley Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 1999
    Messages:
    1,279
    Likes Received:
    0
    The main thing to remember is to be forceful and make sure that you're running the show. If you feel like you're being pressured, walk away.
    The best advice I can give is to USE THE INTERNET. Use it to research the invoice price and MSRP of the car and all of the options. Also use it to get in touch with the Internet sales person at the local dealer(s). If you use sites such as www.carsdirect.com you can get in touch with these people and (for me) it usually makes buying the vehicle much easier.
     
  10. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    0
    GM dealers seem to be the worst. Our local Chevy dealer is horrible. We went in and test drove a Blazer a couple of years ago. Meanwhile, they appraised our current vehicle. Then, they kept us waiting for over an hour while they went back and forth playing the "have to talk to my manager" game. I swear I saw our salesman in the back eating a doughnut while I waited for him to finish "talking to his manager."
    Finally, they came out and offered us $19k as trade in for our $35k truck (retail was still $28k and trade-in was somewhere around $24k at the time). We laughed and got up to leave, but realized they still had our keys from when they "appraised" our vehicle. Then, they tried to hold our keys hostage! They wouldn't give them back to us. My usually reserved, shy wife chimed right in:
    "Give us our keys."
    "OK ok, just wait, I'll go see if we can give you a little more for your truck."
    "NO, give us our keys now."
    "Hang on just a few minutes, let me go talk to my manager."
    (we'd already been through this shit for the past hour)
    She freaked, and yelled "NO, I WANT THE KEYS TO MY VEHICLE, NOW!" The showroom went silent. Other customers stopped and stared. The manager came running down the hall with our keys as fast as he could while the salesman stood there and stuttered. We took them and left, and we'll never be back.
     
  11. JasenP

    JasenP Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 1999
    Messages:
    1,280
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Real Name:
    Jasen
    I would also recommend doing your homework before you even walk into a dealership. Know all about your potential car and trade in value of your current vehicle (although I would try to sell it yourself first.)

    If you want to browse, do it after the dealership is closed and you won't be hassled by pushy salespeople.

    Shop around. When you finally settle on a model check with other dealerships and play them against each other. Even if the next closest dealer is an hour away you could definitely benefit from making the drive.

    If you get a bad feeling from the dealership or the salesperson, walk out.

    You might even be Ok with buying a model that is a year or two older. You'll some $$ and most cars have a bulk of their warranty even after a couple of years.
     
  12. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Tim Markley has it right.
    USE THE INTERNET
    Seriously, go to the Edmunds article above, entitled 10 STEPS TO BUYING A NEW CAR: What Everyone Should Know. This will answer all your questions. You were right in thinking the dealer was trying to play you for a sucker.
    Also, rent the movie "Suckers" and watch it for a great laugh about car dealers. The stuff in the movie is exaggerated, but NOT MY MUCH.
     
  13. Luc

    Luc Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 1999
    Messages:
    227
    Likes Received:
    0
    I bought my Honda Accord from a one price Honda dealer. It's a fix price, no negotiation and I thought the price was pretty good. I like those and it was a pleasant experience except for them trying to push warrenties on us, but that's to be expected.

    Anyway, wasn't there a site called autodirect or something like that which allows you to go this route. Also, where can I find a list of dealers that have the no negotiation policy? I'm ready for my second car and this is the route I like to take.
     
  14. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Luc,

    See the above link. Read the Edmunds article. "One Price" dealers are the same as "High Price" dealers.
     
  15. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 1998
    Messages:
    12,060
    Likes Received:
    925
    Location:
    Michigan
    I hate to repeat what's already been stated, but Edmunds.com is a very useful tool for researching both your next vehicle purchase and the sale of your current vehicle. Even though we had a good connection at the dealership, I still used this site to research prices before we bought our 2002 Nissan Altima a few months ago. It gave me piece of mind knowing that we really were getting a good deal on the car.

    I would also agree with the statement that you are better off trying to sell your old car yourself instead of trading it in (although I know that circumstances sometimes make this difficult). The dealership will never give you as good a price as you can get yourself. Edmunds also has some great tools to help you price your used car right for selling.

    I have never run into the "we need a credit card before we can talk" approach from a dealer. That tactic would cause me to immediately walk out of the dealership.
     
  16. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2000
    Messages:
    1,232
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  17. Luc

    Luc Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 1999
    Messages:
    227
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  18. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2000
    Messages:
    5,030
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  19. Peter McM

    Peter McM Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 1999
    Messages:
    957
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Real Name:
    Peter
    I am a car salesman.

    While I find a rather self-depricating sense of humor to be healthy in this business, I find some of the negative characterizations being made here to be rather offensive--and I consider myself very hard to insult.

    Many of us strive on a daily basis to be honest and respectable in this market, and I can say that I go home most every evening able to sleep at night.

    As for the internet, these sites leave out numerous details that are on actual manufacturer's invoices, doc fees, regional ad assn fees, and so forth. If you want the complete picture, ask your friendly sales rep to show you an invoice. I'll be only so happy to do so.
     
  20. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2000
    Messages:
    5,030
    Likes Received:
    0
     

Share This Page