DD-EX requires a 6th channel, right?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Todd smith, Apr 12, 2002.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2002
    Messages:
    643
    Likes Received:
    0
    In order to get DD-EX I would need one rear center speaker, correct? And a DD-EX receiver of course. If the choice came to a receiver with better sound quality and no DD-EX compared to a slightly less quality sounding (but noticable) receiver but had DD-EX which should I choose? Will movies with DD-EX have another surround format that will still sound nearly as good?
     
  2. Earl Simpson

    Earl Simpson Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2002
    Messages:
    803
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are not enough DVD's out there to jump at this point, and Hollywood is not on the bandwagon yet. So, I bought a 7 channel due to the feeding frenzy over EX and ES, but a 5.1 is good enough and may be the buy of the year right now with the new models coming out. The HK 520 for $598 is looking good. I have the 3802(excellent). 5es for $750 and JVC 10 for 918 are great buys also for 6 and 7 channel. 898 for $1070 if you are rich. Anything above that , you need to think separates, which I am not as in not an expert.[​IMG]
    PS/ I went through all this in Jan and bought the 3802. All DD DVD's are recorded in at least 5.1 with a few offering DTS/EX/ES. There are a few stereo DVDs left, but not many. I think I would go with the best 5.1 I could find in my budget. If money is no option, then the 989 and 5803 are really fine units. But at that price range you need to go separates.
     
  3. StephenL

    StephenL Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    0
    Todd:

    I'd like to try to dispel a misconception about receivers with rear surround processing and the type of DVD software that you need to benefit from their features.

    A lot of folks incorrectly believe that receivers with rear surround processing, i.e., Dobly Digital-EX, DTS-ES, only work with DVD software that has been especially encoded with EX or ES surround back channels. The fact is that a regular 5.1 digital soundtrack, either Dolby or DTS, that has a lot of aggressive use of the side surround channels can be decoded by receivers with rear surround processing and they will produce very effective rear channel sound effects.

    One of my favorite demonstration DVDs of rear surround effects is Saving Private Ryan, and it isn't even encoded in EX or ES. So even though there are relatively few EX and ES soundtracks there are still a lot of action movies out on standard 5.1 DVDs that have great rear surround on receivers equipped with this feature.

    Your question of course asks us to make a value judgement of the trade-off between 5.1 and so-called "6.1" processing. I just wanted you to know that "6.1" receivers may have a bit more value than most people think.

    Larry
     
  5. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll add on to what Larry wrote. [​IMG]
    *Most* receivers that include 6.1 and 7.1 processing include modes that "expand" 5.1 DD and DTS discs to a 6.1 or 7.1 speaker set up. So that means you can enjoy the greater number of speakers with *all* DVDs out there.
    But, you do have to be careful of applying DD EX/DTS-ES decoding to non-6.1 discs. Some DVDs do have a phantom rear channel that isn't noted on the DVD jacket.
    But on DVDs with a lot of common mono info between the 2 surround channels, if you apply DD EX/DTS-ES decoding, the sound field will collapse from the original surround channels into the (new) single or double set of rear channels.
     
  6. Earl Simpson

    Earl Simpson Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2002
    Messages:
    803
    Likes Received:
    0
    OK Todd, Its time to buy. I did this for 2 months ( swinging back and forth from one rcvr to the other).

    It all depends on your budget!

    hk520=$598

    Sony da5es=$750

    Denon 3802=$780

    JVC 10= $918

    Onkyo 898= $1070

    These are all outstanding units that will give you good service and make you happy/happy/happy

    If you will die without 6/7channel then knock the 520 off your list. If you need individual bass channel adjustment and 6/7 channel with 6 amps, then take the 3802 and 520 off your list. The Sony does it all and then you jump to the JVC 10 which is a real beast at 49# with hefty amps.

    Thats why at $598, I think the 520 is in a great price range.

    Or you could wait for the Onkyo 700 and 800 to come out.
     
  7. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2002
    Messages:
    643
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your encouragement and advice Earl. Obviously you know the mental anguish I am going through trying to decide. I am leaning heavily towards the h/k 520. The ONLY thing that is holding me back is no dd-ex. I am trying to decide how important this is to me. I am thinking since this is my first HT setup that I will be plenty impressed with a good 5.1 setup for a few years. I personally like the quality sound of the h/k more than the other receivers I have heard (3802,797,PE 36tx, yam 2200) The 520 is missing that main feature which I mentioned, but there is going to be a compromise with any receiver I go with. That being said, I dont feel I should compromise sound for a few extra features, especially considering I will be listening to a fair amount of cd's. I found a pair of speakers I love (jbl s38) and have heard they go well with the h/k. I have also decided on the svs 25-31pci, so just need the receiver and tv (looking at some 32" models). So do you feel my compromise should be with something other than sound? Again thanks for the support. I had no idea what I was getting myself into when I came to this forum for the first time. As confusing as it has been at times, I feel it is a blessing that I stumbled upon this place. My original plan was to go with a sub/sat system (which is fine) but I now know I can get much better for similar money and for my personal needs thanks to this forum and audioreview.com. I feel I have received lots of good advice, which has mainly been to go and listen for yourself. I am glad I took this advice because I was also dead set on getting the 3802 (which is a great receiver) but upon auditioning with other model found that I prefered the sound of other receivers even though I really wanted to like the 3802. It is very subjective.
     
  8. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Todd- Me, myself, and I, would try to spend the extra money and get the Denon. (A friend of mine just got a 2802, and I was surprised by how well it sounded, considering that I had been looking at the 3802 for use as a pre/pro in my system.)
    Denons are also very well reviewed for great sound quality in general. (But "hard to decipher" manuals. [​IMG] )
    You also might want to check out reviews on audioreview.com, and whatever you can find on ecoustics.com.
     

Share This Page