damaged tweeter

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Nathan Stohler, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    Last night, I noticed that the dome tweeter in one of my speakers has a couple significant dings in it. I think it was damaged pretty recently. I think it happened when I laid it face-down (it's a floor-stander) to re-attach the speaker wire either after painting or having our carpets cleaned. Just laying it face down did not cause the damage (I've done this numerous times), but my 2-year-old daughter sat on it while it was face down (we thought it was cute at the time), causing the plastic tweeter guard to break off and dent the tweeter. The ironic thing is that the tweeter would not have been damaged were it not for the plastic guard.

    My question is, has anyone else damaged a tweeter in this way, yet still been unable to detect any audible difference?
    I've thought about contacting Boston Acoustics for a replacement tweeter, but it seems kind of silly if I'm not hearing a difference. Replacing the tweeter would only get rid of that nagging thought in the back of my head that I have a broken speaker.
     
  2. Hartwig Hanser

    Hartwig Hanser Second Unit

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    My son made a dent in my B&W CDM NT Center tweeter 4 years ago. I listened carefully and could not detect a difference, neither with music or movie sound, so I just let it be.
     
  3. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    Thank you for the reply, Hartwig.

    It's just my nature to obsess about things like this. If I damaged the dome a month or so ago as I suspect, then I have listened to lots of music since that time without noticing a difference, so I should probably let it go as well.

    Thanks.
    --Nathan
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    It WILL make a difference, but as you've both found, probably nothing to be overly concerned about. As long as there is no crease in the dome, a little masking tape that has been stuck down once or twice to reduce the stickiness a bit should do the trick.
     
  5. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    Thanks, John.

    After some searching on the web, I found a thread over on AVS about this. In addition to using tape, they also mentioned using a vaccuum. I will try to fix it when I get home from work.

    By the way, why would I want to reduce the stickiness of the tape? To avoid further damaging the dome?

    Thanks again.
    --Nathan
     
  6. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I tend to avoid using the vacuum method, especially if you have a strong vacuum [​IMG]

    Yes, I usually just recommend that to make sure no extra damage is done (not likely), but you also don't want to leave any residue on the dome surface, and masking tape is pretty good at not leaving residue.
     
  7. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    Gotcha...thanks for all the suggestions.
     
  8. Mark--M

    Mark--M Stunt Coordinator

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    One of my surrounds has a slighly dented tweeter. [​IMG] It really drives me nuts to think about it too, but i cant hear a difference. If it was one of my fronts or my center channel id have it replaced for sure.

    It the dent is big enough to pop back out on a tweeter id just forget about it and buy a new one. But as long as you guys are on the subject of poping out dented dustcaps (on larger drivers) I thought id share an experiance I had. One speaker I had was dented and wouldnt pop back out with a vacume, masking tape or even duct tape. I ended up fixing it by poking a pin hole in the center of the dent then inserting a piece of "L" shaped wire and just pulling it out. Just using a tiny dab of paint to seal it off since the hole was so small. May be of use to somebody sometime..
     

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