damage on RCA interconnect leads

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Yogi, Aug 14, 2002.

  1. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    How hard/easy is it to damage the RCA connectors on the back of an amp (for signal in). Yesterday I was changing some component positions and moved my 3802 to a separate rack without realizing that I had relatively short interconnects to my amp. When placing the 3802 in the rack i realized that the interconnects were tightly stretched. So I put it back in the old rack and took out the interconnect to see if there was any damage/pullout/deformation of the interconnect leads on the back of my 3802 and my amp. The 3802 preouts seemed solid on the chassis. The amp leads also seemed to be in place. They however seemed to have slight flexibility in them when I held them and lightly pressed them. Now this slight flexibility could have been in the amp leads to begin with but being the anal audiofreak that I am, I kept thinking that I had done some damage. Do you think it is that easy to damage the input leads in an amp or am I imagining things?

    Thanks in advance for your inputs.
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I’m not sure what you mean about the “amp leads” being “flexible” (most cables are flexible, aren’t they?)

    Typically in these situations it is the RCA plug on the cable, or the cable itself, that sustains damage (if anything does). The pin on the RCA can be bent or even break off. The outer round part of the connector can be pried apart so that it no longer fits snugly when you plug in the connector. Regarding the cable, the internal shield connection can be severed from the connector.

    If the center pin appears to be intact (i.e., is not loose or wriggling around) then the connector is okay. If the connector slides into the jack too easily, or feels loose once fully plugged in, you can slightly squeeze the outer round section a little tighter with a pair of slip-joint pliers.

    To check the cable, slightly wriggle it just above the RCA connector. If there is a problem with it, you will hear the signal cutting in and out.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    Wayne, I am talking about the input RCA leads on the amp itself (not the cable). What is the likelihood of that being damaged, due to interconnect pullout (although the cable didn't pullout but was in a high tension state when I moved the 3802). Thanks for your response.

    Regards,
    Yogi.
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Looks like we’re suffering from “terminology confusion” here:
    • Leads = cables.
    • RCA plug = male connector (typically on cables).
    • RCA jack = female connector (typically chassis-mounted on components).
    • Interconnects – see first point, above.
     
  5. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    Thanks Wayne for your response. I can rest easy now[​IMG] I see what you mean. I had the terminology mixed up. I was talking about the RCA jack damage and seems like I could'nt have damaged those, right? Everything seems to be working fine and sounding right. So it was my audiophilic schitzophrenia rearing its ugly head[​IMG]
     
  6. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    RCA jacks can be damaged by RCA plugs that grip too tightly. And don't worry, I can never keep track of which one's the jack and which one's the plug either [​IMG] I've seen some interconnects which hold the jacks so hard that the PCB inside the component (in my case, it was a CD player, and the RCA jacks were mounted straight to the PCB) flexes and bends a little under the force. Obviously, that can't be good for the PCB. A better component would probably have the jacks attached to the chassis' back plate, and have wires connecting the jacks to the internal electronics, in which case this shouldn't be a problem. The CD player in question was a Denon DCM-270, and I think the 370 has the same 'problem' (if I'm understanding my service manual correctly).
     
  7. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    when you remove the plug, do it in a twisting/pulling motion. also there are some products by Caig that act to facilitate removal by the use of a conductive lubricant.
     
  8. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    I just use locking RCAs now - Dayton Audio, $10 for a set of 4, pretty nicely constructed. Saves me a lot of frustration when I'm reaching around behind a hot tube amp [​IMG]
     

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