Curious: Why don't they make 2.35:1 TVs?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Miguel Paredes, Dec 14, 2001.

  1. Miguel Paredes

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    The widescreen TVs now are 1.78:1, why not go 2.35:1 or even more? Anyone know?
     
  2. VicRuiz

    VicRuiz Second Unit

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    Why on earth would you want to do that? Just for DVD's? Remember these are HDTV's. They are meant to watch HDTV (16:9 = 1.78 AR). The fact that DVD's look good in them is just a bonus.
     
  3. Miguel Paredes

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    That is true - HDTV is 1.78 - forgot about that.
     
  4. Kishu

    Kishu Stunt Coordinator

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    Then I'm curious as to why DVD movies can't have standard 1.78:1 format-so we could have a full screen experience?

    Cheers,

    Kishore
     
  5. Miguel Paredes

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    I don't think it's about the DVD, it's about movie makers using different aspect ratios for their artistic tastes. I would hate it if they made DVDs different from the director's intentions, i.e. cut out parts of the scenes, aka pan and scan.
     
  6. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Because most movies aren't shot at 1.78:1.
    Most are shot at 1.85:1 or 2.35:1. It's just the AR that is popular. Not to mention, the lenses, film and cameras are all designed for those AR's.
    The reason why HDTV was made as 1.78:1 is because it's a nice middle ground between "standard" 1.33:1 and 2.35:1.
    By the way, all anamorphically transfered DVD's are formatted to display correctly on a 16x9 (1.78:1) screen -Which is why 1.85:1 and 2.35:1 movies still need letterboxing bars on HDTV's. It's not just a "bonus" that DVD's look good - It was planned that way [​IMG]
    -Ryan Dinan
     
  7. Miguel Paredes

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  8. BradZ

    BradZ Stunt Coordinator

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    a correction to the correction-

    1.85 movies are not compressed to fit 1.78. overscan in most sets simply hides the small bars that are actually there. if you set a 16:9 set to 0% overscan (which I don't think is advisable) you would see small bars.
     
  9. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Just an addition to the correction to the correction [​IMG] -
    Some studios crop the left and right sides of a 1.85:1 movie to "make it" a 1.78:1 AR.
    -Ryan
     
  10. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey Brad -
    I just noticed you're in MO [​IMG] Where's Crystal City?
    -Ryan
     
  11. Miguel Paredes

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    Of course. Thanks all for clearing up the confusion (brought on by me)... [​IMG]
     
  12. Oren

    Oren Stunt Coordinator

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    If I can just throw in a monkey wrench...some film-makers actually prefer 4:3 and film that way--and then cut out a 16:9 rectangle out of the 4:3 image for the movie.

    Air Force One is an example of this. The 4:3 version actually shows everything that's in the 16:9 movie, plus more.

    At least, that's as far as I know.

    So, it doesn't matter what format TV you get - you're always going to have formatting issues.
     
  13. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I don't want to say the director prefers 4:3 and cuts a 16:9 or 2.35:1 rectangle out to show in the theater, if he preferred 4:3 it would be shown in the theater that way.
    If the director is filming this way (soft matte) to cater to the TV audience he will use care to prevent bloopers such as visible microphone booms in the area above and below the part cut out for theater showing.
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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