CRT-based RPTVs going out of style.

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Chad Ferguson, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. Chad Ferguson

    Chad Ferguson Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2000
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went into Future Shop today to buy myself a Toshiba 51 RPTV. He had none in stock and when I asked if they were getting anymore in he said no. So then I asked about the Sony's, and the Hitachi's, all no's. Seems to me that RPTV is not going tobe sold anymore and that DLP, LCD, and Plasma's have finally taken over. Does this mean come around november there will be a huge price drop on DLP tv's? I really love the affordability of RPTV's like the Toshiba 51H85. Anyone spread some insight into this?
    Thanks
     
  2. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2000
    Messages:
    2,909
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Real Name:
    Michael Chen
    Greetings

    The game is over ...

    Oh yes ... the DLP and the LCD units are RPTV's too.

    You mean CRT based RPTV's. [​IMG]

    The big units are not profitable to make anymore. Worse for wear out of the box and take up more valuable storage space.

    They can make more money on the digital units. Don't expect any immediate price drops because of this. Cars didn't drop in price when the horse buggy company stopped production.

    Regards
     
  3. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 23, 1999
    Messages:
    2,983
    Likes Received:
    6
    Yep, CRT RPTV is going out to pasture. Sad though, I thought Samsung was able to make the CRTs smaller in size hence smaller in width.
     
  4. Shane J

    Shane J Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am experiencing it in attempting to sell my RPTV.

    No one seems to want one anymore...even at a great price.
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you want one get it now while you still can. Still a fair amount of factory refurbs available in CRT RPTV too.

    Heck almost 3 years ago, I bought a factory refurb, it has worked out very well for me.


    My next display will definetly be FP, probably LCD FP.
     
  6. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    0
    Costco has a Toshiba 65" CRT RPTV for $1499.
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    >>> Yep, CRT RPTV is going out to pasture. Sad though, I thought Samsung was able to make the CRTs smaller in size hence smaller in width.

    Making the CRT's smaller reduces the resolution because the electron beam spot can only be made so small on the tube face.

    Although CRT gives the best blacks and contrast ratio so far and CRT can handle just about any native resolution, CRT RPTV and FPTV require frequent convergence and the units are heavy compared to DLP and LCD.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Thread title updated to reflect the author's intent. Also, yes, it's sad but inevitable: The industry wants users to dump CRT technology, despite the fact that it still, after all these years, provides the finest-possible picture.
     
  9. Larry Sutliff

    Larry Sutliff Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2000
    Messages:
    2,861
    Likes Received:
    10
    Have DLP's caught up with CRT's yet when it comes to black levels?

    I'm still using my Panny 47" CRT, and it still looks great. I do admit that having to reconverge the thing can be a pain from time to time, and it's a beast(how did people ever fit a 60" CRT set in their house?!). But I'm happy, for now at least.
     
  10. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    DLP is, to me, the most promising of the post-CRT technologies, and its best black levels are closing in on the old technology.
     
  11. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    0


    How often do you have to reconverge your Panny?

    I still yet to do anything with mine after over an year, having it ISF'd.

    I can't tell any difference that my convergence is off. The set is use everyday.

    It's a great set.
     
  12. Larry Sutliff

    Larry Sutliff Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2000
    Messages:
    2,861
    Likes Received:
    10
    Tim,
    The convergence seems to drift every couple of months. It's usually very subtle(a tiny bit of red or blue, for example), but I notice everything. I guess getting the set ISFed would be a good idea, though I'm thinking of saving my pennies for one of those 1080p DLP sets that are coming to the market.
     
  13. Tim Jin

    Tim Jin Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    0
    My next next will be a plasma. The more that I look at them, the more I want one.
     
  14. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 23, 1999
    Messages:
    2,983
    Likes Received:
    6
    If I didn't have on already, I would jump on it. CRT is so sweet when it comes picture and even at 65 inches you'll get a great picture. If it has HDMI it definetly worth a look.
     
  15. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1

    Short answer is no. CRT has practically infinite on/off CR capability, and the highest DLP has reached, privately modded single-chip is somewhere approaching 10K:1. However, the demand for the on/off CRT capability is not the only issue involved in choosing a display. Keep in mind that CRTs have poor ANSI contrast, so shadow detail is poor compared to the very high ANSI numbers of single-chip DLPs. So when you say "blacks" this is an ambiguous thing, since in a lot of actual scenes, because of ANSI contrast DLPs will have deeper blacks and better shadow detail. However, in very low APL scenes, the black floor of DLP will become visible and apparent, and this is especially the case with full-black scenes where CRT just plain dominates. It really depends on how important this is to you in choosing a display, along with a zillion other factors.

    I think most people would be happy with 3k:1 contrast ratio, more demanding folks would be happy with something closer to 10K:1 (which isn't really on the market yet). To get CRT blackout capability though, you'll probably need to get a good bit beyond 10K:1 out to that 20K:1 where measurements start to become meangingless as precision of the black measurement disintegrates. However, as digitals approach that point, the superior ANSI capabilities mean that there will be much greater capability of getting that blackout while holding shadow detail in higher APL scenes, something that cannot be done with CRTs. CRT black level calibration is always a tradeoff between shadow detail and black-out.
     

Share This Page