Crossover: where should it be set, and the impact on what a speaker does?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Morris, Feb 27, 2002.

  1. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    After reading a post from back in March by SOHT reviewer Brian Florian, I have a whole bunch of questions about setting speakers to large, setting a system crossover, setting individual speaker crossovers, and whether ANYONE really needs full range speakers for movies or music. He contends that:

  2. Bob_A

    Bob_A Supporting Actor

    Jul 30, 2000
    Likes Received:
    "Finally, if what Brian says is correct, is there any reason to get speakers that extend below 80Hz for HT at all as long as you have a good subwoofer?"

    John, I think the idea is that there is no "right" way to do it. As it is, some people do not even prefer a flat frequency response below 100Hz. I say experiment a bit, and go with what works best for you. Good luck!
  3. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Hi BobA: Thanks for the response, but I want to see the graphs for the crossover affected dB decline by frequency. If a crossover point of 80Hz means a -3dB decline in volume by 80Hz, then what will the relative volume be for that speaker at 60Hz, 40Hz etc...? I'm hoping some EE can give me the answer. I am not considering EVER having less than full range front or side surround speakers since SACD or analog bypassed audio does not undergo digital processing or digital crossover processing. Right now, I really like listening to my SACDs but also have an Outlaw ICBM in my office and am wondering if I should use it, and if so, how it would impact what I hear from my 5 non-subwoofer channels? How negatively will it impact my imaging? Will I be bothered when my rear channel bass comes from the front of my room(yes, I can detect bass direction down to around 65-70Hz or so)? Maybe I should just sell my speakers, build 7 ACI Jags, buy another SVS Ultra, and use the extra bucks to buy a bunch of DVDs and SACDs???

Share This Page