Crossover point

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Boris_V, Jul 14, 2001.

  1. Boris_V

    Boris_V Agent

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    I was just curious about one thing: i read that receivers have a fixed crossover point to the subwoofer (at least some of them). Now let us think you have speakers which are capable of playing sounds decent down to 150 Hz, but the crossover point on your receiver is 80 Hz, so you lose (you'll not lose them at all, but the speakers will reproduce poor sound at that range nevertheless, so i used the term lost) all the sounds that are inbetween 81 - 149 Hz. Am i right? Why receivers don't have adjustable crossover points, so that you would be able to optimize the receiver to the speakers?
     
  2. JohanK

    JohanK Second Unit

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  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    I would guess that including adjustable crossovers is also more expensive, cost-wise, as well as processing-power wise. Some chips might simply just not be able to do it.
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  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    It would take a pretty tiny speaker to have bass extension only to 150Hz. Like perhaps those Bose cubes. Any speaker with at least a 6” woofer will easily get down to 80Hz or lower, and most speakers with only a 5 ¼” woofer can get to at least 90 or 100Hz.
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    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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