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WillG

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Question, does anyone know if the commentary track is full length track. On the SE DVD release the commentary track went on for several minutes past the end credits. I believe the Blu release didn’t include that extension.
 

Dave H

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I watched the first half of the TV edit. I have to say, I found it very interesting with the different footage incorporated. Of course, I much prefer the theatrical and the editing, but the scenes that were used have an interesting perspective aside from any dubbing.
 

WillG

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I watched the first half of the TV edit. I have to say, I found it very interesting with the different footage incorporated. Of course, I much prefer the theatrical and the editing, but the scenes that were used have an interesting perspective aside from any dubbing.

it’s easy to see why some of it was cut. For example the part in the beginning where spicoli was taking about the Jagger guitar pick rambled on for too long (seemed like they were letting Penn improvise for that). Some others like that as well
 

Ronald Epstein

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I am one of those holding out for the 4k release rumored for next year.

However, there is a great advantage to buying the Criterion edition. While I don't know anything definitively about this, I would assume that any 4k release from Universal is not going to include the TV edit as a bonus. It's this kind of gems that make the Criterion release worth a purchase for some.
 

Dave H

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it’s easy to see why some of it was cut. For example the part in the beginning where spicoli was taking about the Jagger guitar pick rambled on for too long (seemed like they were letting Penn improvise for that). Some others like that as well

Yes, a lot of the sequences do not play out nearly as well, yet interesting in how they decided to edit it for TV. There is a bit more of Nicholas Cage. Did Amy Heckering originally supervise the TV edit, or was it done by the studio?
 

Dave H

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I am one of those holding out for the 4k release rumored for next year.

However, there is a great advantage to buying the Criterion edition. While I don't know anything definitively about this, I would assume that any 4k release from Universal is not going to include the TV edit as a bonus. It's this kind of gems that make the Criterion release worth a purchase for some.

Yes, usually both releases in these cases are "needed" for the true fan.
 

Mark-P

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Is this the same issue?
No. What that video is attempting to illustrate (and perhaps is fallacious) is that rather than use SMPTE framing standards they used the complete width of the negative and reframed shot by shot to their own discretion. However this basis is based on the belief that the 4x3 master is truly open-matte, whereas it could actually be zoomed and IT is the version that is manipulated scene by scene. For Fast Times the SMPTE chart shows that a huge chunk of the left side of the original negative (soundtrack area) should be cropped out but only a small sliver on the right, begging the question if the Criterion is properly framed, where did all the extra right-side information come from on the previous transfer?
 
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Malcolm R

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I doubt many directors took much interest in TV versions. They'd have to be full of edits, cuts, and compromises, so they're no longer representative of your vision. Just let the studios handle it.
 

B-ROLL

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I doubt many directors took much interest in TV versions. They'd have to be full of edits, cuts, and compromises, so they're no longer representative of your vision. Just let the studios handle it.
I've also heard of otherwise - specifically for airplane version edits - which would then become the TV version. Unless it was going to be an "event" version IAMMMMW comes to mind as NBC aired the much of what was in the extended cut (including Dick Shawn's um dog costume sequence) over two nights and put a bunch of material back in.

I've heard some directors had riders in their contracts as to what and couldn't be cut.
 

AlexNH

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No. What that video is attempting to illustrate (and perhaps is fallacious) is that rather than use SMPTE framing standards they used the complete width of the negative and reframed shot by shot to their own discretion. However this basis is based on the belief that the 4x3 master is truly open-matte, whereas it could actually be zoomed and IT is the version that is manipulated scene by scene. For Fast Times the SMPTE chart shows that a huge chunk of the left side of the original negative (soundtrack area) should be cropped out but only a small sliver on the right, begging the question if the Criterion is properly framed, where did all the extra right-side information come from on the previous transfer?
Very interesting. Thank you.
 

Sam Favate

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I'm sure this has been covered elsewhere, but what is Criterion's reluctance to doing 4k discs? Or is that they can't get the license for those?
 

Lord Dalek

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I'm sure this has been covered elsewhere, but what is Criterion's reluctance to doing 4k discs? Or is that they can't get the license for those?
Its a slew of factors including cost of production, most of their catalog not lending itself to 4k all that well, and licensing issues.
 

TravisR

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I'm sure this has been covered elsewhere, but what is Criterion's reluctance to doing 4k discs? Or is that they can't get the license for those?
I've never seen a specific reason for Criterion but I think it's just because there's not a big enough market for them yet. Out of the boutique labels, Arrow has been pretty gung-ho lately (largely with Italian horror movies) but prior to that, they were releasing one UHD a month. Blue Underground does maybe one every other month. Vinegar Syndrome now seems to do 2 releases in conjunction with their sales in May and November. And Severin has done 2 or 3 so far this year. I'd like to see Criterion move into UHD but I can't say that it seems like they're missing out on a really large market either.
 

Lord Dalek

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I've never seen a specific reason for Criterion but I think it's just because there's not a big enough market for them yet. Out of the boutique labels, Arrow has been pretty gung-ho lately (largely with Italian horror movies) but prior to that, they were releasing one UHD a month. Blue Underground does maybe one every other month. Vinegar Syndrome now seems to do 2 releases in conjunction with their sales in May and November. And Severin has done 2 or 3 so far this year. I'd like to see Criterion move into UHD but I can't say that it seems like they're missing out on a really large market either.
And again it doesn't help that Criterion's catalog is largely made up of films that were not taken care of very well and/or chewed up by the rudimentary filming technology of their day.

I honestly don't see the point of a 4k of Rules of the Game. Do you?
 

Derrick King

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Only about 20 or so of the 1000+ titles that Criterion has released have been released on UHD somewhere in the world. So, while they have do stuff like Silence of the Lambs*, that might be a strong seller on UHD, no one is rushing to put out the vast majority of their existing catalog on UHD. (*MGM does license UHD rights, but there is no guarantee that they licensed Silence of the Lambs' UHD rights to Criterion.)

They do have new-ish 4K masters for a number of titles that they have already released on Blu and I am curious if they are saving these for when/if they start releasing UHDs. Although I can't imagine the UHD market will ever be big enough for something like The Complete Jean Vigo, but it might eventually be big enough for Walkabout.
 

Dave H

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At this late in the game and based on their statement last fall, I doubt Criterion will ever release UHD BDs.
 

Lord Dalek

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I wouldn't be surprised if the indifferent response to their lone venture into 3D Blu-ray soured Criterion on multiformat releases in general. Once burned, twice shy and all that.
 

Sam Favate

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I watched the Criterion last night and thought it looked better than I’d seen the film look in a long time (probably since the theater). The different crop didn’t bother me at all, and although I hadn’t seen the film in a while, I’m certain I saw detail that I hadn’t before.

This is really a cut above the teenage comedies of its era, and I credit Heckerling’s directing and Crowe’s script for that. I’d really place this in a category with American Graffiti and Dazed and Confused, films about teenage years that have something mature to say about the culture in general.

Also, the music can’t be beat. Those artists must’ve felt they owed Crowe a favor since they all turned out original songs for the soundtrack, many of which would have anchored an album of their own (Jackson Browne, Don Henley, etc.).
 

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