Criterion 8 1/2 Question

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Brian*D, Jul 16, 2004.

  1. Brian*D

    Brian*D Auditioning

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    Hi everyone, I am new to the forums.

    I recently bought Fellini's 8 1/2 (my first Criterion [!]) and was wondering about the dubbing. I know that Fellini didn't care much about making lips match up to the actors because his films were shot silently (as were most Italian films of the time). But the dubbing on my disc seems blatantly off; there appears to be a half-second delay on every line spoken. Is this normal on this disc or is mine defective? I wrote to Criterion and they told me that Fellini just didn't care, but I was wondering if it's supposed to be that every line of dialogue comes in about a half second before the lips of the actors start moving. Thanks!
     
  2. Gonzalo Merchan

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    Many of Fellini's films are this way. There is a joke about it in Day for Night by Truffaut where an actress who worked with Fellini says sometimes he just had the actors count out loud and he would make up the dialouge later. I would guess it's OK.
     
  3. Deepak Shenoy

    Deepak Shenoy Supporting Actor

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    I had posted the same query a couple years back ...

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=55619

    Anyway, welcome to this forum and congratulations on your first Criterion. 8 1/2 is an excellent place to start and it is one of my most watched Criterions.

    -D
     
  4. Brian*D

    Brian*D Auditioning

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    Hey, thanks for the info and link.

    My real question though was regarding the delay before each line of dialogue. The syncing didn't botherme at all, but I didn't recall the entrances of dialogue being so misaligned with the beginning movement of the mouths of the actors.
     

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