Crimp vs solder?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Chris L, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. Chris L

    Chris L Auditioning

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    I found the following website and am interested in making my own RCA interconnects:

    http://www.bus.ucf.edu/cwhite/theater/diycable.htm

    Is a mechanical crimp better than a soldered joint, or is this an issue up to much debate? In the past I have always soldered my interconnects.

    Chris
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    It is easier to be more consistent with crimping vs. soldering. I have not looked at this site in a while but I believe it shows details using Canare (video) connectors which are made to be crimped. Canare makes audio RCAs too (which are decent) that require soldering. WBT (you can look at partsexpress.com) makes crimp sleeves for different gauge wire and then the connector gets screwed on the crimp sleeve. There's lots of sites for info incl:

    http://www.geocities.com/jonrisch/index2.htm

    Best of luck with your project.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    There’s no mechanical advantage to crimping. However, it's the best way for people who can’t solder to make their own cables.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    As far as I can tell, a well soldered connection will maintain electrical integrity forever unless physically damaged. Any mechanical method of joining is susceptible to oxidation.

    When banana plugs are chosen or required over direct connection of wire ends, the attachment of the wire to the back of the plug, if not soldered, cannot be forgotten and may need to be retorqued every few years to counter oxidation.

    There are tradeoffs, for example the act of soldering can melt insulation which in turn can alter the impedance of coax cables.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. Chris L

    Chris L Auditioning

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    Phil et al:

    Now my head hurts, I spent 3 hours last night reading Jon as well as others websites[​IMG] It sounds like I am going to go the solder route since it will be less expensive and if done correctly a better connection. I remember Jon Risch when he "discovered" belden 89259. Is the Belden 89259 still the best choice out there? Who sells the WBT clone rca connectors? Are there other connectorts for lets say $5-10 a piece that are worth considering?

    Thanks!

    Chris
     
  6. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    I like Neutrik ProFis. I think they are $10.99/pair at Markertek. I have not bought them in a while. The Canare audio RCAs are not bad either and from memory a bit cheaper. LAT International (latinternational) used to sell WBT-like connectors that were a little cheaper but not tons cheaper. Vampire C5xs work well with the 89259 but are not cheap (from memory $16.50/pair - but I have not checked). Canare incidently makes (from memory) 2 audio RCA connectors and both are decent. I've heard the Dayton connectors are decent but I have not used them. I no longer use 89259 (I've have to commit a crime to tell you what I use now[​IMG]) but it is every bit as good as many boutique brand name cables that are more expensive.
     

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