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Cricket- A lost American

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Grant B, Mar 2, 2003.

  1. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Even though I once played the game, and I use play lightly, I still am lost by it.
    I am watching the movie Lagaan, which I might say is the Best Baliwood movie I have ever seen, and am lost at a few points.
    When you catch the ball on the fly, the batter who hit it is out (tell me if I am wrong). But what then is the whicket for?
    If the score is 184 for 3 (whickets?) how does the the 3 enter into the score. If the other team scored 185 for 4;would they win?
    After all the batsmen are out, the other team bats. If it's a 3 day match then does the other team bat again if the day is not over?
    I like the movie but am totally confused on the game.
    Much thanks for all your replys
    I guess this could go into the Movie section, but I put it here since I have questions on the game, not the movie.
    Cheers!
    Grant
     
  2. CharlesD

    CharlesD Screenwriter

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    A batsman can be got out by either the ball hitting the wicket and dislodging one of the bails on top of it, or by being caught out.

    185 for 3 means that the team scored 185 runs with three players beig got out. To win the other team must get more runs at the cost of the same or fewer wickets.
     
  3. Joe Wong

    Joe Wong Second Unit

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    The term wicket has many meanings in cricket...

    1. 3 wickets for 185 -> this means 3 batsmen out for 185 runs already scored (so wicket refers to a batsman's chance at bat...losing his 'wicket' means he's out).

    2. the 3 sticks (stumps) with bails can also be called the wicket and is the focus of many methods of getting a batsman out (run out, hit wicket, bowled, lbw or leg before wicket, etc.).

    Hope that helps!

    Joe
     
  4. Joe Wong

    Joe Wong Second Unit

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    Also, there are two types of game:

    1. one-day cricket, where team A has a fixed number of overs (usually 50) at bat, then team B has its chance at overhauling the total of team A given the same number of overs (an over is a set of 6-ball bowls or pitches by one bowler). The final run totals count, rather than the number of wickets lost...so if A scored 1 wicket for 250, and B scores 9 wickets for 251, then team B wins.

    2. first class cricket, where each team has 2 innings, with unlimited overs until a team has lost 10 wickets or declared the innings closed. Again, who wins depends on total runs scored in both innings, though if team B can't overhaul team A's total, but still has wickets to spare, the game can be drawn.

    Joe
     
  5. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Thanks everyone!
    I must admit the game still confuses me but the infield fly rule in baseball and icing in hockey still at time throws me.

    The end of Lagaan confused me where the batter needed only a single.
    Anyways it is a very good movie, even if you don't know the game. If you do know the game definitely check it out
    One sticky wicket Grant
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    There are some good explanations of cricket (especially for Americans) here.
     
  7. andrew markworthy

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    With the greatest of respect to Joe, there's a bit more to the time limit rule.

    In one day cricket, as has already been said, each side takes a turn to be in bat for a limited number of overs (typically 50). If the whole team is out before the 50 overs are 'used' - tough, that's the end of the innings.

    In longer matches, the tactics are a bit more complex. In the easiest scenario, Side A bats until everyone is out, then Side B bats until everyone is out, then Side A bats again until everyone is out, and then Side B bats again. Now, one of three things can happen:

    (a) Everyone in Side B is got out before Side B's total number of runs for the two innings exceeds the total score from Side A's two innings. In which case, Side A wins.

    (b) Side B's total number of runs exceeds that of Side A's. In which case, Side B wins.

    (c) Side B's total score has neither exceeded Side A's total nor are all of B's players out. *But* the match has reached the end of its alloted time (typically, 3 days for a match between county sides, and 5 days between international sides - the latter is called a 'test match' BTW). If time runs out without a conclusive result, then the match is drawn.

    Okay, that's the easy scenario. More complex ones concern what happens if a side put into bat does unusually well or unusually badly.

    Suppose Side A goes into bat, but every member of the team is got out before all that many runs have been scored. Side B can insist that Side A 'follows on'. In other words, Side A goes into bat again without Side B taking its turn at batting. This may sound insane, but it's intended to speed up a game if there is an horrendous mismatch in ability. Let's take an example:

    Side B goes into bat first and scores 400 runs in their first innings. Side A goes into bat and is all out for 20. It is made to follow on, and gets another 100 in the second innings before it's all out again. Side A's total is 20+100 = 120. In other words, hopelessly less than Side B's total from one innings of 400. Insisting that Side B went into bat for a second time before Side A were put into bat a second time would just have delayed the inevitable.

    In another scenario, a side may deliberately stonewall to force a draw. For example, suppose that Side A has had two innings and got a total of 600 runs. Side B got 300 runs in their first innings and (obviously) need 301 runs to win. However, the match has dragged on and is now in its final day. Getting 301 runs in a day's play is possible but tricky, and going for runs generally increases the chance of getting out. Under such conditions, Team B may deliberately resort to safety play, not attempt any risky runs, and hope to survive the rest of the day and make do with a draw. This is deadly dull to watch. If you've followed cricket for any period of time, you know when a match is likely to end this way, which explains why the final day's play in many matches is poorly attended.

    And then there's 'declaring'. This is when a batting side stops batting early (i.e. before all their players are out). This may be because the side feels it already has got enough runs and wants to get a chance at getting the opposition team out within a reasonable time frame.

    And this is before we get onto the issue of wickets 'turning'. Some wickets may start off favouring e.g. the batsmen, but during the course of the match may begin to favour the bowlers. Team captains may deliberately declare to take advantage of a wicket that has favoured them but is now turning.

    There, now that's made things a *lot* clearer, hasn't it?
     
  8. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Thanks Andrew, I knew it was a complex game
    When I played for the Askam-In-Furness they just screamed at me to run when I hit the ball....I never knew just why.
    When the batter hits the ball and the he runs to the other side and visa versa the other runner...does it count 1 if they switch places or 2 since the other runner travels to where the batsman hit the ball.

    Thanks Lew I will check that site....and I will be set for the next major motion picture that uses Cricket as a backdrop[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. Joe Wong

    Joe Wong Second Unit

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    Andrew,

    I know where you're coming from...I'm an Aussie!! I was trying to simplify things [​IMG]

    The tactics of the one day game have changed a lot, too, in the past 20 years. It used to be a score of between 230 and 240 in 50 overs was a very solid total...nowadays even 270 isn't safe!

    Grant, that is counted as 1 run.

    Cheers,

    Joe
     
  10. andrew markworthy

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    You know, I think I've worked out why American movies use Brits as villains. It's a subconscious acknowledgement that a country that could invent cricket is capable of any untold evil. [​IMG]

     

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