Creating a House Curve

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by GregBe, Nov 11, 2005.

  1. GregBe

    GregBe Second Unit

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    Calling all EQ experts (and amateurs [​IMG] ),

    I just recently purchased an Axiom EP500 sub for my 3000 cubic foot room, and am very pleased. I have the new Velodyne SMS-1 EQ on the way. One advantage of the SMS is I can store up to 5 different curves and switch between them on the fly. What I was thinking of doing was to have one of those be flat. For the others, I was going create a few different house curves and find out which would work best for me.

    I understand the concept of the house curve, so you don't need to explain that, but if you were me, how steep of a curve would you create? What would be some alternate choices? Is is best to create a straight line curve from say 20-25 down to 80hz, or do you want it flat in the upper region?

    Any and all thoughts would be much appreciated.
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    usually people like and/or are used to bloated bass which is a big bump in the sort of 50-60 hz range, it kind of "hits" there in the gut but isn't so deep that it's rumbly as it is down well below that. If I were to deviate from flat bass, it would likely be in that range where it would yield the most pleasing results. However, I do think that flat bass while it may not be as immediatly impressive for guests or newbies, is much more pleasing to me or anyone with a critical ear.
     
  3. GregBe

    GregBe Second Unit

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    Thanks for the reply Chris,

    I would agree with you. I can't stand bloated bass. Flat is probably where I will end up anyway. The only reason I was considering it was I thought that if I remained pretty flat down through 40-50 (where most music resides), and sloped up a little from there, I could have the best of both worlds for music and movies.

    I am excited, because it looks like it may be pretty simple to try a few different things and decide for myself.

    Greg
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    absolutely worth trying out if you can, sounds like an easy way to do it. I think you'll find that if you boost the really low stuff, while there isn't a lot of music that comes through down there, it is more than you think, and it will sound strange and be a little fatiguing. I don't know what you'll prefer in the end, you're probably right that you'll come to prefer flat, but I think i'd start by boosting that sort of 40-60 range maybe, I think you'll find that the most familiar and actually kind of fun sometimes if you want to rock out. Enjoy! [​IMG]
     
  5. GregBe

    GregBe Second Unit

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    Thanks again[​IMG]

    I looked over at Sonny Parkers Snapbug site. At the bottom of the page he list several example BFD curves I would say 1/3 are flat, 1/3 slope evenly from 20hz to 80hz by a total of 10dB, and 1/3 slope evenly from 20hz to 80hz by a total of 15hz. I think I will try all of these as well as your suggestion.

    Greg
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    It’s not hard to determine the house curve you need. Just play a sine-wave test tone at your crossover point - 80-100 Hz in most cases - and at 30-32 Hz. With flat response you’ll probably find that the 80-100 Hz tone sounds quite a bit louder (that’s why flat response typically sounds bad). The idea is to get both tones sounding like they are at the same level. When you get them both sounding the same, measure them both, and you’ll find that the 30-32 Hz tone now measures higher. Shoot for a flat line between those two points, and you should be good to go – or at least be in the ballpark. Naturally, your ears should be the final determining factor.

    Doesn’t hurt to try, but I think you’ll find it unlistenable in most situations – movies or music. I’ve found that things sound best when you shelve response at about 30-32 Hz; other people I know shelve at 25 or even 20 Hz. If you keep response rising, you may find that things sound unnaturally “heavy.” I’ve also found that response that rises all the way to the lowest frequencies obscures bass texture and detail (assuming your sub can render it).

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. GregBe

    GregBe Second Unit

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    Thanks Wayne,

    So are you saying that once I achieve this, I should then flatten it out from 30-32 down through 20 or so?

    Greg
     
  8. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Yes, that’s what shelving at 30 Hz would do. Go ahead and try what you were proposing; it never hurts to experiment. But if you think it sounds overly bottom-heavy, try the shelving.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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