could you be a food/wine critic?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Ted Lee, May 24, 2004.

  1. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    so i was watching this show my fiancee tivo's. some kind of "wine for beginner's" type show. it's hosted by this gal and she gives nice, low-level overviews about wine.

    anyway, she was having dinner with this dude and they started talking about how this dish, with it's spicey flavor went well with that wine, with it's spicy tinge ... and how the citrus flavor of the dish's sauce "carries over" (or whatever term she used) the flavor, blah blah blah.

    they both were nodding their heads like they knew what they were talking about. of course, i believe they did!

    that got me to thinking about when i go to nice restaurants. i can say i've been to all the top restaurants in this town. while i feel i enjoyed the meal, i never ever thought about how the flavors melded, how the sauces enhanced, or how the spices kicked the dishes up a notch. really, i guess i just go because everyone else is going or to check out the place ... or just to say i've been there.

    i guess my tongue just doesn't work that way. i can't tell what spices or ingrediants are in the food. plus, i don't drink alcohol (anymore [​IMG] ) so i guess that doesn't help the dining experience.

    anyway, just curious about you all. do you gets that "high-level" enjoyment when eating at fine restaurants? what do you get out of it?
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    I’m pretty far out on the food and drink scale—but I think that I could be a food (or at least restaurant). But I don’t think that I could be a wine critic, as I don’t have the ability to remember accurately wines in a specific sense. At least like real experts can (and by the way, many of these wine experts have to pass very rigorous tests to achieve certain certifications—‘Master of Wine’, for example).

    I do have a pretty good sense of what I am eating and drinking at the time, and I can usually identify broad categories of wines and ingredients in complex dishes.

    I pretty much always pay attention to the food I’m eating and how it all comes together. To your list, I would add texture and color as well as some of the tastes you mention. Just as you don’t want the flavors to all be the same, I prefer to not have an entirely ‘white’ dinner—or one where there is no variance in texture.

    BTW, I don’t just pay attention at fine restaurants—there is no reason not to have a good meal well donw on the cost scale.
     
  3. MikeSerrano

    MikeSerrano Second Unit

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    Same problem here... sort of. When I drink (too much) wine I sometimes don't have the ability to remember the previous night's events accurately.

    -Mike
     
  4. John*C

    John*C Stunt Coordinator

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    Colloquial English was said my Commander JJ Adams AKA Leslie Nielson on "Forbidden Planet" to Robby the Robot. The robot asked the Commander what language you wanted him to speak in 1956; when I was 9 years old been speaking it ever since.[​IMG]

    BTW what part of the movie didn't I understand to get responses, such as these you have given me on this thread subject?
     
  5. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    wtf? :b
     
  6. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    heh, kinda like how 'audiophiles' with 'golden ears' describe sound. Sharp, bright, harsh, tight, loose, boomy, colorful, airy, forward...

    Those may not be the best examples, as i've heard terms that you'd never think could describe sound, but i can't remember them.

    For food, i've not had the chance to go to a very high end restauraunt. Heh, you should hear how the judges on IRON CHEF describe food [​IMG]

    "Red M&M, Blue M&M, it all comes out the same color in the end" [​IMG]

    Edit: Ohyes, i concur with Ted re: John*C's post. :b
     
  7. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    whew, glad to know it wasn't just me. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Leila Dougan

    Leila Dougan Screenwriter

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    Nope, could never do it.

    I enjoy good food and fine dining. I can describe food as excellent and of high quality. But I can't even begin to describe the ingredients I taste, let alone how they all work together. I couldn't care less about color and I'm not a big fan of different textures.

    Ah, well, I'll leave this sort of thing up to the pros.
     
  9. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    I confess I'm a food snob. I go in for all this stuff because I tend to have epicurian tastes. Even as a child my mom said if it was the best in the store I'd go straight for it. It plays havoc with my less-than-generous salary too. [​IMG]

    But it is fun once in a while.
     
  10. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    Nah, my tastes are far too proletarian :b I mean, I enjoy the fine-dining experience with the missus and all (anyone ever come to Singapore, St Pierre does a very good degustation menu at a very reasonable -- for a French restaurant -- price), but by the same token I'm also happy munching a pizza or ribs.


    Just saw an episode of Frasier, where the two of them were squaring off for a "Master of Cork" title at their club or something, the final taste, both said it was Napa Valley, Frasier thought it was cabernet sauvignon, Niles thought it was merlot, turned out to be 55% merlot and 45% cab, so Niles won. I thought: eh? Surely to be a "master" you need to identify vineyard and probably vintage as well, just identifying grape variety, heck, I can sometimes do that.

    (Which also reminds me of two Jeffrey Archer short stories, but that's another story...)
     
  11. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Of course that was for a local wine club—nothing professional.
     
  12. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    I’ll bet that you might be more influenced than you think Leila.

    Consider a main dish of veal with some type of a cream-based sauce. Served with cauliflower and white asparagus on a simple, stark white plate. Now change the vegetables to broccoli and green beans, where both vegetables are just a little underdone, so that they have just a bit of a bite.

    For me, the first dish is not nearly so appealing as the second, even though the both might be equally nutritious and each individual ingredient just as tasty (on its own) as the other. Now the first can be saved a bit, with some garnish, such as parsley to relieve the monochromatic scheme.

    Of course you may not ever think about this at all, and perhaps you really don’t care, but I’ll bet that most people will react at least subconsciously to the differences.
     
  13. Leila Dougan

    Leila Dougan Screenwriter

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    Lew,

    I think it certainly has a difference to most people. Probably even some difference to me, subconsciously.

    But in the end, I'm one of those wierdos that doesn't like to have my different foods touching each other. I usually will ask for a side plate then transfer one food over to it so I can eat it. Then when I'm done, I'll move another food type over. I have almost never been one to eat a bite of this and a bite of that throughout the meal.

    And I know the "correct" way to eat veggies is to have them slightly undercooked (certainly not overcooked) but I can't seem to eat them that way. I guess I just like all my food overcooked so it's a bit mushy (even pasta). Well, meats don't turn mushy when overcooked so I guess that's my main exception.

    You probably think I'm a mental case LOL. It's alright, food just isn't my thing I guess.

    Actually I take that back! Desserts are definitely my thing. I'll pay a ridiculous amount for a small piece of cheesecake, for example, if I know it's going to be excellent. In that case, presentation is a big part of it. [​IMG]
     
  14. John*C

    John*C Stunt Coordinator

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    I have edited my post to tell you how I learned to speak Colloquial English, please go back and read the new one.

    O/T You might understand it but then you might not have been 'born' yet, I am now 57 years old.[​IMG]
     
  15. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    I can never become a food critic. I like everything. Of course I think Fois gras is overrated. Bland as hell, and I've been a glutton for punishment to order it three times in different parts of the country.

    Food Expert: "Notice the subtlety in flavor."
    Me: "Subtlety in food? Ridiculous!"

    It goes something like that?
     
  16. ZacharyTait

    ZacharyTait Cinematographer

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  17. andrew markworthy

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    Food critics for newspapers and magazines - I find it consoling to know that with half the world starving, there's room for these pretentious parasites to moan about over-priced food they've eaten at someone else's expense. I'm sure someone here can produce a justification for these people, but to me they're a complete waste of space.
     
  18. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Even though I usually agree with your thoughts Andrew, I have to say that while I understand your sentiments, I disagree with your conclusions in practice. One could apply the same criteria to travel writers (for only one example).

    I for one found the Egon Roney guide to pub food to have steered me to many fine (unpretentious) meals throughout your fair island. This may not be produced any more—I’m not sure.

    Or are you just having a go, and I missed the humor?
     
  19. ChrisMatson

    ChrisMatson Cinematographer

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    A little harsh, no? Can't the same be said for any luxury? Car reviews, DVD reviews, etc... Why not just take the money and feed the world?
     
  20. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i've had it once ... loved it! but i think all that iron chef watching really peaked my curiosity. expensive as hell though.

    i once bought a guide-book to fine-dining in the LA area. i think it was called the epicurian guide...or something like that. i discovered a lot of nice restaurants that way ... most of the meals weren't terribly expensive, but they certainly were higher then average. i'm glad i got to try out a lot of those restaurants, but just like now, the whole time i was there i was like "yeah...this is nice but no big deal."

    actually, there was one excpetion. lawry's prime rib on la cienega (i think) ... [​IMG] i could eat there just about every night!
     

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