Could someone explain RS-232 ports?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Tom_Price, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. Tom_Price

    Tom_Price Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't understand how these ports work. I hear they are used for remote control of other units and I know I have one on my receiver, DVD player, CD player, and electic projection screen. How would I use the connection to its ability with these components?

    Thanks,
    TJ
     
  2. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    RS232 ports are more commonly known as serial communications ports on a computer. These serial ports allow for "bits" of information to pass through the wires of an RS232 cable one bit at a time, i.e., in single file. In effect, the process is extremely slow in the data transfer department. It is extremely inefficient in today's PCs, but may be ok for audio/video equipment though.
     
  3. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    they're mainly used when you need to upgrade the firmware for the component.
     
  4. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    My old Sony Surround system used to have these to hook up each individual component to each other. I never really saw the advantage. I think it was so you could turn on each component by using only one button on the remote. I hardly ever used it.
     
  5. Dave Koch

    Dave Koch Stunt Coordinator

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    >>> they're mainly used when you need to upgrade the firmware for the component.

    Why would I have it on my Rotel Amp?
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Well, some THX equipment include a DB-25 connector for the line-level inputs. These connectors have the advantage of having screws to lock the connector in place. They are identical to a RS-232 connector, but they are really for analog inputs.

    There are some high-end Crestron/et. al controller systems that will use the RS-232 connections on some equipment to do basic control functions like "turn on", "change volume". But it's not real common because the protocol and command-sets are different for every device. And since almost all of these components have to have a IR port to receive commands from a remote - it's actually a lot of extra expense to put a RS-232 jack.
     

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