Cost to hang sheetrock

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Glenise, Aug 25, 2001.

  1. Glenise

    Glenise Supporting Actor

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    Can someone give me a ball park figure on the cost to just hang sheetrock?
    (no taping, muding or sanding)
    Is this cost based on per sheetrock piece or the entire room?
    A friend told me that the cost is $7 - $10 per sheetrock piece.
    I think some union guys told her this.
    Thanks.
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    http://geocities.com/myhometheater/
     
  2. Colin Goddard

    Colin Goddard Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Glenise, I live in northeast Ohio. In this area, hanging drywall goes from 15 to 25 cents a square foot, not by the number of sheets. This price was given to me by some friends that are carpenters. When you figure up the square footage of each wall, ( that means height x lenght) do not subtract for door and window openings. When shopping around for a drywall hanger, ask them what they charge per square foot.. Price could very some if you have vaulted or cathederal ceilings, because of the extra labor to reach these areas.. Also try to have the drywall hanger use at least 12 foot long sheets, this means less (seams). Hope all this helps.. Colin Goddard [​IMG]
     
  3. Glenise

    Glenise Supporting Actor

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    Thanks guys that really helps to know how much it's going to cost!
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    [Edited last by Glenise on August 25, 2001 at 05:36 PM]
     
  4. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Glenise,
    Well seeing as how I'm a drywall contractor I suppose I might be able to help you out. [​IMG]
    Colin pretty much nailed it on the head. When hanging drywall in new construction it is almost always figured by the sq/ft. The only exception is if the job is very small, like a half day project or such. My base price starts at $.13/ft and goes up from there. An example of this would be a room with flat 8ft ceilings, no angled walls, no soffet, and a normal amount of electrical boxes. The more of these that you have (ie.. lots of extra outlets, vaulted ceilings, angled walls, a bunch of soffet in the kitchen) will make the price per foot go up and up. I've done new construction jobs as high as $.32/ft.
    A few things to keep in mind before you hire a hanger:
    1. Get references. Talk to your local building inspector, if you have one, and get his opinions first. They will usually have an unbiased opinion on contractors and can tell you about the quality of their work. Even if there is no sheetrock inspection in your area, this would be a good place to start. If the B/I can't help you, talk to some of the General Contractors in the area. They will normally have a good idea who the better quality hangers are in your area.
    2. Make sure you inform the hangers about everything you plan on doing that might effect their job. Installing more than the normal amount of outlets would be a good example. Things like this tend to take more time and the hanging contractor will likely charge more. Also, if you do any of the wiring yourself, make sure you push the wires as far into the box as possible. This will eliminate cut wires from the use of drywall routers.
    3. Although using 12ft sheets is fine in some situations, it is not neccesarily the best way to go. "Picture framing" is normally the best way to hang drywall. In other words, if you have a wall just under 16ft, make sure they use a 16ft sheet. Just under 12ft, use a 12ft sheet. Even if there are doorways or windows. This will eliminate "butt joints" in any part of the wall.
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    [​IMG] "See the world on the wings of rock and roll"
    [Edited last by Kevin Potts on August 26, 2001 at 11:02 PM]
     
  5. Brett Loomis

    Brett Loomis Stunt Coordinator

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    Kevin- If it costs between $0.13 and $0.32 per sq/ft. to hang the sheetrock what should I expect to pay for finishing it....Mud, tape sand and ready to paint?.
    I am considering doing sheetrock on the ceiling for my finished basement, What price should I expect to pay for hanging on walls and ceiling?? My basement is approx. 1,000 sq. ft. I am struggling with sheetrock vs. 2 x 2 suspended grid for accessability reasons. I would prefer sheetrock to obtain Max Headroom but am nervous about future access needs or problems.
    Thanks, Brett
     
  6. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    I can't offer any advice on cost, but here's a little tidbit for the do-it-yourselfer...hang the sheetrock on the ceiling before you hang it on the walls. [​IMG]
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    Bill [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Brett,
    Just like hanging costs, finishing cost will vary from place to place. Prices here in KS range from $.25 to $.60 per sq/ft.
    So let's see what we have:
    Roughly 1000 sq/ft of floor space will add up to around 3500 sq/ft of walls and ceilings. Keep in mind this is an educated guess since I'm limited by the fact that I haven't seen your basement.
    If your ceiling height is just under 8ft, (this is normally the case in basements) and you don't have very much soffet covering up mechanical work, you can figure the hanging price to be about $.16 sq/ft. Keep in mind this figure is based on what I charge here in my neck of the woods, so you might want to add a couple of cents for good measure.
    Finishing price I would guess to be about $.35 sq/ft. Once again you might add a little to that.
    The price of drywall will also be affected by where you live so for 5/8 inch (ceilings) I'd figure $.20 sq/ft. For 1/2 inch (walls) I'd figure $.17 sq/ft.
    So we have:
    $.18 to hang
    $.38 to finish
    $.20 for approx. 1300 sq/ft of 5/8. (1300 ft will allow for scrap).
    $.17 for approx. 3000 sq/ft of 1/2. (Once again allowing for scrap).
    That would add up to be:
    $260.00 for the ceilings.
    $510.00 for the walls.
    $774.00 to hang.
    $1634.00 to finish.
    For a grand total of $3178.00
    Please keep in mind that given the limited available information, this is a very rough estimate at best. Prices can very greatly from job to job and region to region.
    Your best bet would be to find a competent contractor and get an estimate relative to your area.
    Good luck and if you or anyone else has any more questions, feel free to post them or e-mail me at mailto:[email protected] "See the world on the wings of rock and roll"
    [Edited last by Kevin Potts on August 31, 2001 at 01:48 AM]
    [Edited last by Kevin Potts on August 31, 2001 at 01:50 AM]
     
  8. Brett Loomis

    Brett Loomis Stunt Coordinator

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    Kevin----You are the man!!! You are teaching us amateurs well!
    Bill/Kevin- Why is it so important to hang the sheetrock on the ceiling first?? I haven't done it before so it may seem obvious too many.
    I will have more posts/questions on the details of my new basement HT construction project. Framing of walls and elevated stage start this week.
     
  9. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Brett,
    There are actually a few reasons for hanging the lids (ceilings) first. First off, it's easier to get a tight fit with your seams if you hang the lid first. Second, in a home with 8' ceilings, the walls are constructed about an inch and a quarter over 8ft. Since the drywall is 4ft high, this allows for the lids to be hung first and still leaves a slight gap at the floor where the carpet installers can tuck the edge of the carpet. Also, it's much easier to screw through the drywall into the bottom plate of the wall than having to mark out each wall stud to screw to.
    While drywall does actually strengthen the walls and ceilings of your home, hanging the ceiling first will not neccesarily affect the structural integrity of your home. It's a matter of convenience more than anything else.
     
  10. Brett Loomis

    Brett Loomis Stunt Coordinator

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    Kevin, I am getting started this week on my basement HT framing and will be buying all of my materials for the project. I know I should use 5/8" sheetrock for the "lid" but is it necessary for the walls?? Cost is not a big issue so I would much rather have any added benefits of sound, structural, or insulating characteristics 5/8" provides over 1/2". I want the best overall sound deadening and so I think 5/8" is the way to go. Any last minute advice?
    Prices for USG Sheetrock in Canton, Mich (Metro-Detroit)
    4 x 8 x 1/2" = $3.98
    4 x 8 x 5/8" = $5.28
    Brett
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  11. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Brett,
    Other than fire rating issues, the only time I would suggest using 5/8 instead of 1/2 would be if your studs are centered at more than 16 inches apart. As far as the extra sound deadening, I'd imagine there would be a slight gain if you went with 5/8. How much I wouldn't venture to guess. As far as any last minute advice goes, do you have a hot tub? If not you might want to find someone who will let you use theirs because you will be one sore puppy after hanging rock for several hours. I kid you not, you'll find out that you have muscles you never knew you had so be prepared to buy a lot of Bengay. [​IMG]
    Have fun and take your time doing it. I'm sure you will enjoy it that much more when it's completed knowing you did a lot of it yourself.
    Good luck my rookie. [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]"See the world on the wings of rock and roll"
     
  12. Brett Loomis

    Brett Loomis Stunt Coordinator

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    Kevin/Anyone---If it were your HT would you use 5/8" or 1/2"?? At a premium of $1.25 per sheet plus the manual labor (Me and some poor bastard helper) of carrying each sheet (40+ total) through my house and no less than three turns....I think you get the picture now.
    The added cost is not a big deal, but between needing it for the ceiling/lid and wanting the best sound deadening possible I'm leaning towards 5/8". My studs will be 16" on center and I would think 5/8" would be more kid proof also.
    Anyone know or understand the sound advantages of 5/8" over 1/2"?
    I'll probably hit HD (Home Depot) on Friday AM to get started for the weekend on framing. I probably won't hang the sheetrock myself and I have absolutely no interest in mudding, taping and sanding.
    Thanks again, Brett
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  13. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Brett,
    If it were my house I'd probably go with 5/8. It is stronger and I'm guessing it would help a bit in keeping the sound in/out.
    40 sheets huh?
    You might want to check out a regular lumber yard or drywall supply center if there are any in your area instead of going to Home Depot or the like. They can probably deliver and stock it for you for a little more money. My local lumber yard tacks on a dollar a sheet for in home delivery. That's not bad considering how much work you will be saving yourself. To me it's harder work to stock sheetrock than it is to actually hang it.
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    [​IMG]"See the world on the wings of rock and roll"
     
  14. Brett Loomis

    Brett Loomis Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Kevin, That's a great idea to pay for delivery all the way to my basement!!! Easily worth a buck a sheet...to watch someone else hump that trip....40 trips down and 40 trips up....NO THANKS....I will be calling local lumber yard for an extra $50.
    Thanks again, great tip.
    Brett
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