CoolerMaster 0wnz the HSF Market!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brett DiMichele, Apr 26, 2002.

  1. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Hey Folks,
    Many of you may remember that I was on a quest to find a
    great HSF for my NON OverClocked Pentium 4 machine. Some
    may even remember JonR flaming me for being so anal about
    getting a Great HSF for a NON Clocked machine.
    Hey this is all about fun and if you got it, Spend it!
    So I went to www.directron.com about a month ago and asked
    if they could special order me CoolerMaster's Everest HSF
    which is an all Copper HSF with Heat Pipe Technology.
    Much to my suprise I recieved an email from Jason at Directron
    and he was more than gratious enough to special order me
    that cooler.
    Well, that took over a month! Not Jason's fault mind you.
    I believe CoolerMastere shipped it over from China on the
    Paddle Boat (even slower than the Slow Boat From China) [​IMG]
    Today the nice Mr.OOps man showed up to deliver my package
    of doom! The CoolerMaster HSF had arrived. I opened the package
    only to find that CoolerMaster shipped Jason the wrong cooler.
    After looking at it and reading the box I determined that
    they sent me a HSF that uses the same HSF as the Everest
    but this particular unit is called the Fujiyama and it uses
    an ultra quiet fan (Looks like a Sunon). No harm no foul, I
    am not about to wait for another month while CoolerMaster
    paddles the right one across the pond.
    So I take it out of the packaging and what shocks me most
    is the substantial weight and the finish. This thing has a
    polished finish that would embarass most engine compartments
    of show cars.
    When I flip the cooler upside down there is a sticker over
    the entire CPU Die surface area of the HSF.. I remove this
    sticker expecting to find some cheesy heat pad. Nope, just
    a perfectly shiny lapped base. They included a package of
    white thermal grease.
    I took my time and masked off the base of the HSF just large
    enough to extend slightly beyond the dimensions of the P4's
    IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader). Then I cleaned the area with
    Isopropyl Alcohol and I applied enough Arctic SilverII
    Compound to cover the area. I used a piece of plastic wrap
    over my finger to spread the compound. I throughly cleaned
    and re applied Arctic Silver II to the CPU's IHS in the
    same fashion.
    Installing these CoolerMaster HSF's is a snap, literaly. The
    Heat Sink makes use of the stock Intel HSF base that comes
    on every P4 Mother Board. The CoolerMaster has fingers that
    enguage this base and use cam locks to FIRMLY seat the unit.
    So does this thing work? Well, as other Arctic Silver users
    know, it takes a day or so for the AS to completly bond with
    the CPU and HSF surfaces. I fired up Seti@Home which I always
    run as a foreground application (all the time) and that uses
    100% of my 1.8 Ghz P4 needless to say it generates heat.
    Before with another CoolerMaster aluminum HSF, which in and
    of it's self was not a bad cooler, I was running at 115-120
    Degrees Farenheight. (No celcius here please, this is America!)
    And after installing the CoolerMaster Fujiyama Heat Pipe?
    109 Degrees Farenheight!
    Is that a drop? I would say so! [​IMG] I expect as the AS II
    settles in it may even drop and stay below 100 Degrees.
    And all this cooling goodness will cost you a mere $37.00
    which makes it a clear cut winner over anything that ThermalRight,PAL
    or Swiftech have to offer. Plus in the tests I have seen the
    CoolerMaster bested, the best by at least 9 degrees.
    So if you are a cool freak (Overclocked or not) this is a
    worthwhile HSF to check out!
    And yes they even make one for those AMD chips! [​IMG]
     
  2. Matt Stryker

    Matt Stryker Screenwriter

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    Some people will pay anything to be cool....

    Just kidding Brett, I've seen some of those setups on overclock sites and they look pretty neat. Make sure you get one of those little mini-vacs too; those dust bunnies can cause heat buildup and are tough to get off heatsink fins.
     
  3. Rusty Ray

    Rusty Ray Second Unit

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    i have that one too but the only complaint i have is that its a bit loud... well, compared to the stock fan i had in the athlon xp 1700+
     
  4. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Rusty,

    They make 2 versions. I have the low noise pollution version

    the fan blows 26CFM of air where as the other version blows

    46 CFM and is substantialy louder. For the Athlon's they

    only make a loud version.
     
  5. Rob Lutter

    Rob Lutter Producer

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    But, I like that hairdryer noise in my computer case... I wanna know that it is working [​IMG]
    With AMD, you have ~ 10 seconds to power down the computer after the fan fails till the CPU crashes and BURNS [​IMG]
     
  6. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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  7. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Wayne,
    Speed Step technology, Ain't it great?
    I wish my car could do what the P4 can do when it senses
    an overheat condition (just shut off a few cylinders).
    I believe the P4 begins to cut back the processing power
    at 155 degrees or so.
    The fact that AMD's fry within a second merly shows how
    overworked they are even in non OC'd form just to do what
    a P4 can do without breaking a sweat. And these guys OC
    those things???? Yeesh! [​IMG]
     
  8. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    P4s would do the same thing w/o SpeedStep. The new AMD chips have the throttle-down technology.
     
  9. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Jeff,

    P4's do not typicly run as hot as the similar speed AMD

    Processor though.

    It is a moote point I guess, I surely would not run my P4

    without a HSF reguardless of the safety features built in.
     
  10. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Nobody would advocate running a P4 without a HSF but it's good to know that there won't be a meltdown should the HSF clamp spontaneously break and the HSF fall off the chip.
     
  11. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Wayne,
    I SO agree [​IMG]
     
  12. John_Bonner

    John_Bonner Supporting Actor

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  13. Drew Wimmer

    Drew Wimmer Stunt Coordinator

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    alpha makes an equivalent of their pal8045(socketA hsf) for the p4 (I forget the model #, 89-something) that works pretty well, i favor it myself 'cause it accepts an 80mm fan so you can still keep it relatively cool without your rig sounding like a 747 on takeoff at 10 meters [​IMG] that and the fact that it's thermal resistance is .23C/W whereas that of the fujiyama is .4 (lower is better)
    you may just wanna send that thing back to directron man, or at least swap the fan out, the everest has a thermal resistance of .25C/W (with disgustingly loud fan), which while it's still not as good as the 89-whatever, it's considerably better than the fujiyama, and aside from that, it looks a lot better than the alpha's offering [​IMG]
     
  14. AjayM

    AjayM Screenwriter

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    Well, just to add a little bit I have an AMD Tbird 1Ghz at home and had a HSF failure, now this was a cheap OEM $12 HSF so it wasn't a huge slab of copper/aluminum like most of the real HSF's are. The case had one exhaust fan on it plus the power supply fan.

    Windows became unstable during 3d gaming (was playing Flight Sim 2k when I noticed), but for normal desktop use I probably would have never noticed. Temps went up quite a bit, even past the AMD top level (I think I saw around 100-105c but no more). Since I discovered the problem that evening, I just made a quick duct, turned the case fan around and was back up and running using the case fan with temps in the high 60's (but I didn't try to do anything that would require high CPU usage).

    When I replaced the HSF, everything went back to normal (and that was over a year ago) and I actually replaced it with something semi-decent this time so I got some lower temps again.

    I didn't have any smoke, no fires, etc. Tom's test of was interesting, but also a little stacked by running those grueling CPU torture tests. I would have liked to see what happens at small CPU usage (figure normal everyday computing) if the actual HSF comes off.

    Also when you guys are looking at HSF's, be aware that the ZIF socket has a rating on it for how heavy a HSF you can attach to it (with the clips), and most of those ultra-heavy duty HSF's exceed it by a fairly high margin (like double or more), most of the higher quality HSF's are now board mounted, but a few aren't. Just something to keep in mind when shopping around.

    Andrew
     
  15. Drew Wimmer

    Drew Wimmer Stunt Coordinator

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    Andrew-
    YIKES! the max temp that any AMD cpu is supposed to be able to tolerate is 90*C, but even then only for a short while, you got reeaaally lucky [​IMG]
    and the new alphas (for socketA and 478) are board mounted, they'd rip the socket off the pcb otherwise [​IMG]
     
  16. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Drew,

    The Fujiyama was sent to me by mistake. I ordered the Everest

    which has a 6K RPM YS Tech Fan rated at 45+ CFM of air (70mm)

    and yes it's noisy. The Fujiyama comes with a 2500 RPM YS

    Tech that flows 25ish CFM and is super quiet. The HSF units

    themselves are exactly the same and by swapping fans you

    can up the thermal efficiency. I installed a 6000 RPM fan

    from my old aluminium Cooler Master HSF and the temps dropped

    even more and this other fan is not real loud at all.

    I am also running Arctic Silver II between between the CPU

    and the P4's IHS.

    Every test I have seen placed the CoolerMaster Everest at

    least 5-10 degrees ahead of the competition (Pal and Sk6)

    the Heat Pipe Technology does work well.

    My biggest gripe about the competition is thier pricing.

    I picked up the CoolerMaster for $36.00 and that's half

    the price of a PAL with Fan and the SK6 with fan.

    Ajay,

    The Fujiyama and Everest from CoolerMaster are all Mother

    Board Mounted. Intel (Unlike AMD) Mandates that thier own

    and other P4 Motherboards all use the same attatchment

    method. On the P4 Mobo's they have a black plastic mount

    that is affixed directly to the motherboard. Intalling a

    HSF on a 478 Pin board is as simple as snapping the 2 cam

    lock clips. Some other HSF's like the Zalmans screw through

    the Mobo but I prefer the OEM method. It is holding this

    massive HSF no problem.
     
  17. Drew Wimmer

    Drew Wimmer Stunt Coordinator

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    Brett-

    could you point me to these tests? i haven't been able to find a single page (in english anyway, and none of the foreign pages have any numbers i can read) that had test results of any sort for the fujiyama or the everest, only links to their socketA counterparts

    i ask because I may be building an intel rig this summer for an HTPC, if the fujiyama and everest are as good as you work them up to be then id certainly use them in place of the 8942 which i currently plan to use
     
  18. AndyVX

    AndyVX Supporting Actor

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    Hey everyone,
    I'd just like to ask what program I should download for getting a reading of my CPU/mobo temps? I don't like having to restart the computer, and enter the BIOS each time I want to check.
    I downloaded one program, called "Motherboad Monitor" (I think) but it didn't work. After loading it up, it wouldn't give me the temps of anything. It just reported everything as 0 degree's.
    I've just added a second hard drive, and will be adding a GeForce4 as soon as it arrives to my computer, and I'm a little worried about the case temp. Should I buy a case fan to mount in the front-bottom of my case as an air intake?
    Thanks a bunch.
    (I would have started a new thread for this, but this one seem somewhat along the same lines... hope everyone doesn't mind? [​IMG] )
     
  19. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Drew,
    I will try and find that review again. But the review I
    read may have been for the Socket A model. Even if the review
    was for a Socket A the Everest still outperformed the PAL
    and SK6's used in the test. After they concluded that the
    Everest did infact drop the temps below what the SK6 and
    the PAL were capeable of, they hacked apart the Everest to
    show that the heat pipes were real, what they looked like
    inside and that there was liquid in them.
    I will look later tonight [​IMG]
     
  20. Drew Wimmer

    Drew Wimmer Stunt Coordinator

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    Andrew-
    motherboard monitor needs to know where it's supposed to get it's data from before it can display anything, thermal monitoring hardware is different for every chipset, so it'll vary across motherboards (mbm is the right program to have btw [​IMG])
    and if you don't currently have any air moving through your case, yes, add fans, but be smart about it, the efficiency of your airflow is just as important, if not more important, than having high airflow volume
    1) make sure you've got roughly the same amount of air entering and exiting your case, a little bit of positive pressure is good to keep dust out (bit more input than output)
    2) make sure you've got your air moving in one general direction (this shouldn't be a problem so long as you use the stock fan mounts for your case, that is, no cutting blowholes)
    You can also get card coolers that mount in the case below the video card (assuming you're using a tower-type case): http://www.plycon.com/coolgear.htm
    something like that first item there is what I'm talking about, it's not absolutely necessary, but if you can't get temps low enough in your case with regular fans, it's good to have a little extra protection for something as expensive as the gf4 you're buying [​IMG]
    Brett-
    ahh, ok, that makes a bit more sense then [​IMG]
    the thermal resistance for the PAL8045 (Alpha's latest socketA hsf) is .05 C/W higher than the PAL8942 (with the same fan, I'm not quite sure how that works, the heatsinks look identical save for the mounting gear)
    regardless, I'm still interested in seeing the review when you find it, if for nothing else than just for better awareness of what's out there, I've been somewhat detached because my priorities have shifted more towards academics the end of the semester
     

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