Cooking Question: Crispy Chicken Strips

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Brandon_T, Apr 17, 2005.

  1. Brandon_T

    Brandon_T Screenwriter

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    I was wondering how do you make the crunchy chicken strips that you get at a place like Bennigans, or Applebees? I have made my own several times and they just come out slightly breaded and without much of the "crispy" part to them?

    I typically wash the chicken in milk then dip in flour and fry up, but it just isn't anywhere near the same. So I was wondering if anyone had any tips or recipes that yield better results. Thanks in advance.

    Brandon
     
  2. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Use a beaten egg first of all to wet the chicken. You can double bread by going from egg to flour to egg to flour - fry. You can also do egg flour egg, and then fry wet. Try adding spices to the egg and to the flour - whatever you like - garlic powder, onion powder, pepper, paprika, salt, sugar.

    I usually cut one large breat into four strips. You should make 8 strips and do them several different ways to find the crispiness and taste you like.

    And use a fryer.
     
  3. Kevin Hewell

    Kevin Hewell Cinematographer

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    [chef]Do a dusting of flour first to coat, shake off excess, dip in a mixture of beaten egg and milk (or just milk if you want to skip the added cholesterol), then dip it in the seasoned breading. Shake off the excess breading and drop it in oil heated to 325-350 degrees and cook until golden brown.[/chef]

    The first dusting of flour helps the egg/milk mixture adhere to the strips.
     
  4. Lynda-Marie

    Lynda-Marie Supporting Actor

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    I thought most of how they got the things so crispy was that they used a deep fryer.

    But fried chicken, as Southerners prefer it, is usually done with cast iron cooking skillets.
     
  5. aaron campbell

    aaron campbell Second Unit

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    Buttermilk. It's the key to a good breading for fried chicken.
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I'd go with breadcrumbs, the fine ground type in a can, with egg.
     
  7. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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    We use Captain Crunch cereal for chicken breading. It's fantastic!!!
     
  8. Kevin Hewell

    Kevin Hewell Cinematographer

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    Also, restaurants use actual chicken tenders for, well, chicken tenders, not cut up breasts. So, if you want them like in the restaurant, use actual chicken tenders.
     
  9. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    what are chicken tenders exactly?
     
  10. John_Stra

    John_Stra Extra

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    Use a cast iron skillet.. and try different breading
     
  11. Matt Souza

    Matt Souza Agent

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  12. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I didn't know chickens HAD tenderloins.
     
  13. Russell G

    Russell G Fake Shemp

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    Cast iron skillet, okay, how much oil? Are you still deep frying?
     
  14. Bob-N

    Bob-N Supporting Actor

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    From my observations, I think it's about halfway up when the pan is full of chicken. If I had to guess, I'd say about 1/2-1" deep, not quite deep frying depending on how big your pieces and skillet are.

    I think that in order to get crispy crunchy style chicken, you either have to do the egg/flour thing a few times or use some sort of wet batter like you would see on tempura. Dunno for sure.
     
  15. DaveMcS

    DaveMcS Second Unit

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    Parts is parts....FUSED !!

    [​IMG]
     
  16. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    Some personal experience, some Alton Brown (Good Eats):
    1 - Flour then egg wash then bread crumbs (I use plain but have heard raves about Panko Japanese bread crumbs). You can also season the flour with salt and pepper or whatever else you like.
    2 - Make sure the fat in the pan is hot before putting the stuff in. If the fat isn't hot, it soaks into the food. You can take the temp and make sure it's around 360 F. I usually throw an egg/bread crumb in first. I figure the oil is hot when it see the crumb bubbling.
    3 - Don't use paper towel to blot the food when it's done. That just holds the oil close to the food and allows it to soak in. Drain on a rack of some sort over a tray or pan.
     
  17. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    I make what I call "Southern Fried Chicken Tenders" using the following recipe.

    Cut chicken breasts into strips (or use tenders). Soak in milk (or buttermilk). Put a few cups of AP flour in a container with a cover (I use those disposable Ziplock/Glad plastic containers). Make sure the container is deep and wide enough to hold around 5-6 tenders at a time. Season the flour with salt, pepper, Old Bay and whatever else you want (I use Emeril's Essence). Move the tenders from the milk to the flour. Cover the container and shake to coat the pieces. Move the pieces back into the milk and coat again. Repeat the flour step. This gives the coating a thickness similar to southern fried chicken. Have a chicken fryer (cast iron skillet, I use a Le Cruset which has a ceramic coating) ready with 1/2" to 3/4" of vegetable or peanut oil at 360 degrees (get a fry thermometer, temp is important). Fry on both sides until golden brown and crispy, turning once. The strips should just touch the bottom of the fryer. Remember to maintain the heat and do not overcrowd (5-6 strips at a time). If you want, save a couple tablespoons of the oil for a roux (flour and oil) to make a milk gravy for dipping (2 TBS flour, 2 TBS oil in pan cook flour until rawness goes away, stir in 2 cups milk and allow to thicken over medium heat, add salt and pepper).
     
  18. Vincent_S

    Vincent_S Second Unit

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    I'm hungry now[​IMG] Thanks guys/gals[​IMG]
     
  19. Brandon_T

    Brandon_T Screenwriter

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    Thank you all for the wonderful tips and suggestions, I will be giving them a try in the next couple of days! [​IMG]
     
  20. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Good luck Brandon. I have to recommend a fry thermometer again. Soggy breading is usually due to the oil not being hot enough or losing it's heat due to overcrowding. The secret to good frying is to have the oil hot enough to cause moisture to steam out of the the food so the oil is kept from soaking in, but not so hot that it burns the outside before cooking the inside. That way the outside is crisp and the inside is still moist and juicy and the food is not greasy at all. Only a thermometer can do this right.

    By the way, the recipe I gave above is also the way I do Chicken Fried Steak. Get some small chuck steaks, pound them thin, soak in buttermilk and flour twice, then fry at 360 deg. Make the milk gravy and proceed to inhale the cholesterol. MMMMMMMM good!
     

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