Converting a Klipsch RF-3II into a center channel

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JasonWaddington, Aug 10, 2002.

  1. JasonWaddington

    JasonWaddington Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I got the single RF-3II. I took the drivers out fairly easily. Problem is, I CANT FOR THE LIFE OF ME pound the motor board off. It seems like if I try to the liquid nails would rip some mdf from the cabinet, which would probably cause a problem with air leaks. Perhaps if I put a wood pole through the port in the back and pound that with a mallet it will come off. Or are there any other methods that would work to get the motor board off?

    Also, how would I make...the rabbited edge to be inserted into the box...the rounded square shape of the woofer outer edge...and the slightly rounded edges of the sqaure at the outside of the tweeter. Just use the old board as a template?

    And tell me exactly how much liquid nails to use when putting on the new board.

    THANKS!
     
  2. JasonWaddington

    JasonWaddington Stunt Coordinator

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    k, i got the damn thing off. now i just need to make the new one. also, how do i get all the residue off the cabinet left by the liquid nails?
     
  3. JasonWaddington

    JasonWaddington Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok. I got the cover off, and I have started making the new motorboard. I put the holes in, he speakers seem to fit well. Problem is, I had to use a drill machine to manually create the recession for the drivers because i have no access to a router, and i messed up in a few places. non of the shapes are perfect by any means, but i figure the perfect shapes would be a cosmetic difference. but i also made a small dent into the recession which would possibly cause air to leak. I think it would be ok to fill the area, along with the other imperfections with a filler of some type,. and lay foam onto the recession to assure that no air leaks. ALso, I plan to screw them on very tighly to prevent air leakage too. Should this be any problem?

    AND, creating the rabbited edge could be tough too. I may not be able to make it perfect. but i figure i could rely on the liquid nails to fill any imperfections i may have made. Is this logical?

    ALSO, perhaps i could fork over some bucks to have a professional wood worker do it for me.

    WHAT WOULD YOU DO?
     

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